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Vietnam



  • In Vietnam, the Pentagon Papers Are History Written by the Defeated

    by Lien-Hang Nguyen

    A Vietnamese historian explains how the Pentagon Papers have become a foundation of domestic histories of war (both before and during US involvement) even as the Vietnamese government has declined to release its own official histories of the conflict. 



  • “The Greatest Purveyor of Violence in the World”

    by Liz Theoharis

    Martin Luther King's 1967 Riverside Church address pointed out that the cause nonviolent civil rights struggle required him to challenge the US government to end militarism. Today, the pandemic shows that an ethos of nonviolence must include an active approach to end suffering through global cooperation. 


  • A Personal and Family History of Encountering Prejudice and Intolerance

    by Ron Steinman

    The author experienced antisemitic prejudice as a college student, but learned more about the pervasiveness of prejudice living in Asia as the husband of a Vietnamese woman during a time of anti-American sentiment, and then when living in suburban America as part of a mixed-race family. While it's necessary to understand the historical roots of racial bigotry, it's also always personal. 



  • I Don’t Want My Role Models Erased

    by Elizabeth Becker

    The work of women journalists covering the war in Vietnam has been obscured in remembrance of the war and its place in American history and culture. The author seeks to recover the stories of Frances FitzGerald, Kate Webb and Catherine Leroy.


  • King’s Final Book: Both Political Roadmap and Passionate Sermon

    by Fred Zilian

    As Black History Month unfolds amid an atmosphere of crisis and division like that which prevailed in 1968, it's worth revisiting Martin Luther King's publication that year of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" – a call for reordering national priorities toward justice through politics and for renewed spiritual and ethical dedication to shared humanity.



  • What Should Drive Biden’s Foreign Policy?

    Columnist and Humphrey biographer James Traub says the former Senator and VP's interventionist liberalism in foreign policy is a model for Joe Biden's administration to reestablish American preeminence in world affairs. 


  • One of the Chicago 7 Reflects on Dissident Politics Then and Now

    by Lee Weiner

    A veteran of dissident politics in the 1960s warns that while today's broad coalition of activists for a more just and democratic America are on the right track, they must learn from the mistakes of an older generation and find ways to keep united despite difference. 



  • The Myth of Henry Kissinger

    by Thomas Meaney

    Barry Gewen's new biography of the American national security figure argues that Kissinger's perspective was shaped by stories older German emigres told him about the end of the Weimar Republic and the rise of Nazism. 


  • The U.S.’s Toxic Agent Orange Legacy

    Washington has admitted to the long-lasting effects of dioxin use in Vietnam, but has largely sidestepped the issue in neighboring Cambodia and Laos.