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Virginia



  • Teaching Black History in Virginia Just Got Tougher

    Glenn Youngkin's attack on "divisive" history lessons clearly put the wishes of conservative whites at the center of the debate about curriculum. Now, a planned change to increase Black history in Virginia schools is on hold and Black students and families ask why their concerns are unheard. 



  • Facing the Truth in the Land of Lee

    by Laura Brodie

    The controversy over removing Robert E. Lee's portrait from diplomas at Washington and Lee University points to an uncomfortable truth: Lee's historical depiction as handsome has been a visual symbol of the Lost Cause that has contributed to acceptance of the pro-Confederate mythology. 



  • A Neighborly Civil War in Virginia over Street Names

    Leaders of a group of suburban Virginia homeowners who want to change the Confederate-related street names in their community have been accused of being puppets of George Soros and threatened. 



  • Questing for the Past

    by Katherine Churchill

    A nameplate in an 1864 edition of Gawain and the Green Knight led the author to discover the connections between a mythic medieval past and the Lost Cause ideology of Jim Crow Virginia. 



  • A Bill Proposed a New Way to Teach History. It Got the History Wrong.

    “The gross mistake in this bill is indicative of the need to have scholars and teachers, not legislators/politicians, shaping what students at every level learn in the classroom,” Caroline Janney, a professor of Civil War history at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, said in an email.



  • Virginia to Dismantle Lee Statue Plinth

    Outgoing Governor Ralph Northam will execute the removal of the pedestal and the transfer of the surrounding traffic circle to the City of Richmond before Glenn Youngkin succeeds him in office. 



  • Virginia Community Colleges to Drop John Tyler's Name

    “We enroll lots of people whose ancestors were enslaved, were marginalized, were clearly taken advantage of,” said Glenn DuBois, the system’s chancellor. “And what do you say to those students when they’re looking at some of these names?”



  • Looking for Nat Turner

    Christopher Tomlins' new book takes seriously the apocalyptic Christianity of Nat Turner, viewing it not as a metaphor for liberation but a key part of how Turner understood freedom. 



  • Just Who Was Rebelling in Nat Turner's Rebellion?

    University of Kentucky Historian Vanessa Holden will discuss her new community-oriented history of the rebellion of the enslaved in Southampton, Virginia in an online forum on Thursday, arguing that women and children were essential in planning and executing the rebellion associated with Nat Turner.