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Robert E. Lee



  • Remember, Lee Betrayed His Country

    by Walter Kamphoefner

    The removal of Robert E. Lee's statue in Richmond was a necessary step in the halting American version of Germany's Vergangenheitsbewältigung – facing the evils of the nation's past. 



  • Retaining Its Name

    Despite a protest movement by students and other stakeholders, Washington and Lee University's institutional changes in response to its legacy of slavery and ties to the Confederacy will not include rejecting Robert E. Lee's name.



  • A Southerner who abandoned the Lost Cause (Review)

    West Point historian Ty Seidule's book traces his own personal path from venerating the Lost Cause myth of the Confederacy to rejecting it, including questioning the number of monuments to Robert E. Lee at the US Military Academy. 



  • Do We Really Need Another Biography of Robert E. Lee?

    by Kevin M. Levin

    Recent discussion of the forthcoming biography of Robert E. Lee by Allen Guelzo shouldn't foreclose the possibility that the book will offer insight because many historians object to Guelzo's participation in Donald Trump's conference on teaching history. 



  • Fraternity that Reveres Robert E. Lee Faces Revolt over Racism

    A Texas chapter of Kappa Alpha called for the national fraternity to repudiate its veneration of the Confederacy, sparking a firestorm among active members and alumni about the place of the Lost Cause and Robert E. Lee in the organization's culture. 



  • The Mystery of Robert E. Lee

    by Allen C. Guelzo

    The supernatural composure attributed to Robert E. Lee was belied by his many anxieties and obsessions, writes the author of a coming biography of the Confederate general. 



  • The Story Behind the Lee Statue in Richmond, Virginia

    by Peter Rachleff

    Now the time has come for the story of the Workingmen’s Reform Party, the building of Richmond’s City Hall, and the solidarity-based politics of the Black and white members of the Knights of Labor, to come out into the light.


  • Historic Houses Turn to Technology Amid COVID-19 Closures

    by Hana Hancock

    Historic home sites have responded to the COVID crisis by developing online exhibits. More work remains to be done, and many cultural and historical institutions are in financial peril from the crisis, reports HNN's Social Media Editor. 


  • Robert E. Lee Wasn't a Hero, He Was a Traitor

    by Michael McLean

    Lee was no hero. He was neither noble nor wise. Lee was a traitor who killed United States soldiers, fought for human enslavement, vastly increased the bloodshed of the Civil War, and made embarrassing tactical mistakes. 


  • The Nonsense Myth About Grant and Lee

    by William C. Davis

    Confederate Lee is remembered as the last of the old America and Yankee Grant as the first of the new one. But in fact they were little different from each other.



  • Happy Robert E. Lee Day!

    Why some states can’t celebrate MLK without remembering the Confederate general, too.



  • Debunking the Myths of Gettysburg, 150 Years Later: Historian Allen Guelzo

    For something that happened 150 years ago, the Battle of Gettysburg still generates its share of controversy. And myth, according to historian Allen Guelzo, “grows like weed out of controversy.”Guelzo, a professor of history at - appropriately enough - Gettysburg College, is the author of the recently published “Gettysburg: The Last Invasion.” He spoke with ABC News Political Director Rick Klein about the battle and his book – an exhaustively researched and detailed dive into the pivotal fight of the Civil War.Among the myths of Gettysburg that Guelzo debunks is that the battle was an accident – that Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and George Gordon Meade’s Army of the Potomac merely happened upon each other in the hills of South Central Pennsylvania. “No, it was not really an accident,” said Guelzo. “At least not more of an accident than any battle in the Civil War was.”