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Jim Crow



  • The Complicated History of One Mississippi Restaurant

    Booker Wright, a Black waiter, shocked the community of Greenwood by shedding his genial tableside manner to tell a documentary crew about the burdens of racial subordination. After the film aired, he was assaulted by a police officer and his bar was vandalized.



  • Before the Anti-CRT Activists, there were White Citizens’ Councils

    by David A. Love

    "Employing the techniques of the White Citizens’ Council, a 21st-century White resistance movement threatens to turn back the clock on civil rights and racial justice and create a new future built on erasing the past."



  • Plessy v. Ferguson at 125

    Harvard Law School Professor Kenneth Mack explains what the shameful decision meant, and why it still matters in 2021.



  • The Long Brutality

    by Keisha N. Blain

    Two police killings highlight the specifically gendered nature of state violence against Black people, and the particular ways Black women are targeted. In this respect, the history of Black Lives Matter is a long history of Black women's political activism.



  • If It’s Not Jim Crow, What Is It?

    by Jamelle Bouie

    NYT Columnist Jamelle Bouie relies on the historical writing of J. Morgan Kousser, who showed that disenfranchisement after 1877 affected African American and poor white southerners, was implemented through color-blind means, and had partisan, rather than simply racial, goals. But it was still Jim Crow, and the comparison to Georgia's new law is fair and valid. 



  • The South's Jim Crow Barriers to Voting Rights are Going National

    Columnist Hayes Brown says that it's only fitting that new Jim Crow-style voting restrictions are a national phenomenon; Thomas Rice, the minstrelsy performer who invented the Jim Crow character was a New Yorker who successfully peddled anti-Black caricature across the nation.