Veto in California on Electoral College





In the end, only one vote mattered.

Saying it ran “counter to the tradition of our great nation,” Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed a bill on Saturday that would have automatically allocated all the state’s 55 electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate received the national popular vote.

The bill, which passed the state’s Legislature this summer, was devised by John R. Koza, a computer scientist who envisioned a system in which a series of states holding the number of electoral votes needed to elect a president — 270 — would commit their electors to casting ballots for the winner of the popular vote, regardless of how their individual electorates voted.



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DM Jordan - 10/4/2006

"...devised by John R. Koza, a computer scientist who envisioned a system in which a series of states holding the number of electoral votes needed to elect a president — 270 — would commit their electors to casting ballots for the winner of the popular vote, regardless of how their individual electorates voted."

Schwarzenegger was correct. The people of California should find it troubling that their vote for President could have gone to George W. Bush in 2004 when that was clearly not THEIR expressed choice. This runs counter to the Constitutional Principle of Federalism, and plays into the still-visible fears that a faction from a minority of the states of the Union could somehow control the outcome of the Presidential race. Should the outcomes of the vote in the nation's 7 or 8 largest cities be able to determine the path for the rest of this vast country? The Framers wanted a President who was not reflective of the whims of the most populous state, but could garner a national appeal. The did take into account the popular will. It's already there! The Electoral College blends both Population as well as Equality of the States (# of Reps + # of Senators), so the electoral vote usually reflects the popular vote anyway. Of course, I mention nothing that anyone here shouldn't already be aware of. This continued panic of a Constitutional crisis from 2000 is surely unwarranted--only 4 elections have not gone the way of the electoral vote, and only one since 1888.

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