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Breaking News

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Skull Fossil Offers New Clues on Human Journey From Africa

    Anthropologists exploring a cave in Israel have uncovered a rare 55,000-year-old skull fossil that they say has a story to tell of a reverberating transition in human evolution, at a point when and where some early humans were moving out of Africa and apparently interbreeding with Neanderthals.



  • Famed SC civil rights protesters have convictions erased

    The convictions of nine South Carolina black men who integrated a whites-only lunch counter during the height of the civil rights movement were tossed out Wednesday during an emotional hearing before a packed courtroom.



  • All the Presidents’ Memorabilia

    Jordan M. Wright’s collection of political memorabilia has been unceremoniously sitting in boxes and crates behind the orange roll-up doors of storage units in Long Island City, Queens.



  • How the Martin Luther King estate controls the national hero’s image

    Selma director Ava DuVernay may well have taken more license than artistically necessary in the confrontational scenes between Martin Luther King Jr. and President Johnson. But inaccuracies in other significant parts of the film were forced upon DuVernay by copyright law.



  • PTSD Found In Ancient Warriors

    A paper, written by Professor Jamie Hacker Hughes and Dr Walid Abdul-Hamid, suggests that the condition existed in the ancient world.



  • Tut’s beard glued back on like a bad craft project

    The false beard on the gold funerary mask of Tutankhamun, probably the single most recognizable ancient artifact in the world, had come off and was reattached with a sloppy mess of irreversible epoxy glue.



  • The voices of Auschwitz

    The 70th anniversary of the liberation of the notorious Nazi concentration camp could mark the last major commemoration for many Holocaust survivors



  • What countries teach children about the Holocaust varies hugely

    Chinese textbooks borrow the language and imagery of the Holocaust and apply them to the Nanjing massacres of 1937 by the Japanese army. Japanese textbooks likewise adopt the language of the Holocaust in presentations of the devastation of cities by atomic bombs at the end of World War II.

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