New Evidence Suggests Shakespeare Not True Bard





Shakespeare's plays were not written by the bard but rather a politician descended from King Edward III and John of Gaunt, remarkable new evidence suggests.

British Shakespeare scholar Brenda James and historian Professor William Rubinstein of the University of Wales propose the real Shakespeare was English courtier and diplomat Sir Henry Neville.

Shakespeare's plays were not written by the bard but rather a politician descended from King Edward III and John of Gaunt, remarkable new evidence suggests.

British Shakespeare scholar Brenda James and historian Professor William Rubinstein of the University of Wales propose the real Shakespeare was English courtier and diplomat Sir Henry Neville.

The research is already being described as "pioneering" by Mark Rylance, the chairman of the Shakespearean Authorship Trust and artistic director at Shakespeare's Globe theatre in London.

The revelations - based on five years of research - are contained in a book to be launched at the Globe.

Firstly, the political content and geographical location of the bard's plays are a perfect reflection of the known travels of Sir Henry, who lived from 1562 to 1615.

Love's Labours Lost echoes in part the issues discussed at Oxford University at the time Neville was studying there between 1574 and 1579. Many characters in the play were known personally by Neville.

Measure for Measure was set in Vienna, where Neville visited in 1580. A theme of the play - laws against immorality - reflects ideas Neville discussed with a leading Calvinist philosopher there.

Romeo and Juliet, The Taming of the Shrew, and The Merchant of Venice were all set in northern Italy, which he visited in 1581 and 1582.

Hamlet was set in Denmark - and, according to James' research, Neville obtained specific information on Hamlet while visiting what is now Poland - and possibly Denmark.

Henry V reflects Neville's diplomatic duties in France between 1599 and 1600. Some of its scenes were written in French, which Neville spoke but Shakespeare did not.

Neville was involved in an unsuccessful revolt by the Earl of Essex against the government in 1601. He was jailed in the Tower of London for treason - when the tone of the plays changed abruptly from historical and comic to sombre and tragic.

The plays also portray many of Neville's ancestors - John of Gaunt in Richard II, Warwick the King Maker in Henry VI part II and King Duncan of Scotland in Macbeth - all in a favourable light.

A document written by Neville while a prisoner in the Tower of London contains detailed notes, the contents of which ended up being used in Henry VIII.


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Elizabeth A Rodgers - 11/15/2005

I was so relieved to hear of the new Rubenstein and James research! For years I have been hotly following the Shakespearian Authorship debate, and was finding myself in the Oxford camp, when, this summer, I read 317 pages of primary sources in Ward's history of the 17th Earl of Oxford, and I was struck by utter the lack of any pizazz, or insight or genius in his entire collected primary sources. So I said to my husband, all may be for naught-I don't think it could have been him, when suddenly, the new book was announced suggesting it might be Neville. How can we get hold of this book on this side of the US? have any scholars reviewed it yet? I am an amateur in the Shakespeare trade, but am a professional in another, and I am saddened by the vituperation normally shown by academics to new ideas in the Authorship Controversy. I was thrilled to see at least one professional site - yours- with an open mind ! First time on your site. Liz Rodgers, Boston.


Elizabeth A Rodgers - 11/15/2005

I was so relieved to hear of the new Rubenstein and James research! For years I have been hotly following the Shakespearian Authorship debate, and was finding myself in the Oxford camp, when, this summer, I read 317 pages of primary sources in Ward's history of the 17th Earl of Oxford, and I was struck by utter the lack of any pizazz, or insight or genius in his entire collected primary sources. So I said to my husband, all may be for naught-I don't think it could have been him, when suddenly, the new book was announced suggesting it might be Neville. How can we get hold of this book on this side of the US? have any scholars reviewed it yet? I am an amateur in the Shakespeare trade, but am a professional in another, and I am saddened by the vituperation normally shown by academics to new ideas in the Authorship Controversy. I was thrilled to see at least one professional site - yours- with an open mind ! First time on your site. Liz Rodgers, Boston.

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