The rubber army of WWII?





The previously unknown story of an army of artists who helped America win World War Two is being told in a new documentary, showing how the artists used their talents to "put one over" on the Nazis.

Eighty-eight-year old Jack Masey's army job during World War II was to blow things up. But not the way one might think.

"I was in the rubber army as I called it. The inflatable army," said Jack Masey.

In 1944, Masey was a 19-year-old aspiring artist who'd just been drafted to fight the Nazis.

The army had just the job for him.  Masey's unit had a mission: to deceive the Germans into thinking Allied forces were in one location, while real U.S. troops advanced miles away.

They became known as "The Ghost Army," a thousand artists, designers and audio technicians using sights and sounds to dupe the enemy....




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