Neanderthal family found cannibalised in cave in Spain





Archaeologists in Spain have unearthed the remains of a possible family of 12 Neanderthals who were killed 49,000 years ago.

Markings on the bones show the unmistakeable signs of cannibal activity, say the researchers, with the group having probably been killed by their peers.

The remains were found in a cave in the Asturias region of Northern Spain. Details of the find appear in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Although the highly fragmented bones of six adults and six children were found in a cave, it is thought they probably lived and died on the surface before the ground collapsed beneath them naturally after their death.

Their end was a bloody one, with distinct markings on the bones showing they fell victim to cannibalism.

"They all show signs of cannibalism. They have cut marks on many bones including skulls and mandibles," said Professor Carles Lalueza-Fox of Barcelona's Institute of Evolutionary Biology, who lead the research....



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