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music



  • Is Old Music Killing New Music?

    by Ted Gioia

    The growth in sales in music is coming overwhelmingly from old songs. Can the music industry sustain new performers if money keeps flowing to old catalogues? 



  • The DC Punk Scene Relied on the Local Latinx Community

    by Mike Amezcua

    "A big piece is missing from the stories told about punk and hardcore in the 1980s: Primarily, that marginalized spaces and communities in urban America gave a stage to the predominantly white subculture."



  • The Beatles Ignited a Culture War and Changed the World

    by Randall J. Stephens

    While Peter Jackson's "Get Back" documentary focuses on the last phases of the band's work together, it's important to think about how the group's emergence changed American culture, especially around sex and gender. 



  • New Orleans Urged to Rename Lee Boulevard after Music Legend Allen Toussaint

    “The City of New Orleans should prioritize celebrating our culture bearers, our diversity, and everything that makes our city special, not those who worked to tear us apart and represent a horrible history of racism that we are still dealing with today,” said City Councilor Jared Brossett.



  • How the Drive-By Truckers Hacked the Music Industry

    by Stephen Deusner

    Through lineup changes, record label hassles, and fans upset with their political lyrics, the Truckers have used the internet and social media to build support and survive for decades. Their story is a history of the changing business and a map for younger acts. 



  • The 70s are Back, But Not How You Think

    by Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff

    "In the coronavirus era, disco themes resonate. People long for community and wonder if leaders have our backs. Social media offers some of the trappings that defined disco — from the clothes to the allure of being seen in a new way."



  • Phil Schaap, Grammy-Winning Jazz D.J. and Historian, Dies at 70

    “They say I’m a history teacher,” he said in a video interview for the National Endowment for the Arts, which this year named him a Jazz Master, the country’s highest official honor for a living jazz figure, but he viewed his role differently. “I teach listening.” 



  • When Europe Gave its Ears to Black American Composers

    by Kira Thurman

    In the wake of World War II many Black American classical composers found welcoming audiences in Europe, but their experiences should not overshadow the ways European cultural institutions have marginalized domestic Black artists.



  • Charlie Watts Put Some Jazz in Rock and Roll

    by Victor Coelho

    "In an era when rock drummers were larger-than-life showmen with big kits and egos to match, Charlie Watts remained the quiet man behind a modest drum set. But Watts wasn’t your typical rock drummer."



  • Reassessing Gladys Knight's Talent and Impact

    "The scholar Mark Anthony Neal has written that Knight was “the female voice of the Black working class in the 1970s”—more grounded than either the divine Aretha Franklin or the glamorous Diana Ross—and the group’s sensibilities were also working-class."



  • Daphne Brooks on Truth-Telling Music

    African American Studies scholar Daphne Brooks tells the back stories of Black women in music and the cultural impact of their songs. 


  • "Juke": Bluesman Bobby Rush on the Roots of Rock and Roll

    by Bobby Rush with Herb Powell

    Blues musician Bobby Rush's new autobiography chronicles his life and career, and the way that the appropriation of Black music into American popular culture often left Black entertainers behind. Read here how he remembers the roots of rock and roll.