;

radical history



  • "No There There": Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on the Future of the Left

    "I’m sitting in the car, barreling down the highway, asking myself, 'What happened in my life that has put me in this position where I have to like listen to this &%$*@ nonsense?' I needed to leave. But like most people, I needed the health insurance."



  • Beyond the State: An Anarchist History of Humanity

    by Daniel Immerwahr

    The late radical anthropologist David Graeber, with his posthumous collaborator David Wengrow, looks to the long sweep of history to assess the prospect of human self-governance without a powerful state. 



  • The Revolution that Wasn't: What did 1960s Radicals Achieve?

    by Michael Kazin

    A new book of narrative history of the 1960s New Left repeats a common error: mistaking rhetoric for revolution and ignoring a key outcome of the decade: that the right emerged more powerful, argues reviewer Michael Kazin. 



  • Myles Horton, Highlander, and the Beloved Community

    by Robert Hunt Ferguson

    "Founded in 1932, the original Highlander Folk School served as an incubator for many of the important ideas that shaped twentieth-century social movements."



  • Learn Lessons about Movement Building from Radical Black Women

    by Keisha N. Blain, Premilla Nadasen and Robyn C. Spencer

    Barbara Ransby facilitates a roundtable collaborative essay about the role of women in building radical movements for justice in Black communities encompassing social welfare, economic security, police accountability, women's liberation and more. 



  • The Real Abbie Hoffman

    by Nathan J. Robinson

    While The Trial of the Chicago 7 is sympathetic to Hoffman, it also softens him in a way that ultimately amounts to historical fabrication.



  • “Nothing Stirred in the Air”

    by Stephen Dillon

    The architecture of the "supermax" prison targets the senses and emotions of the incarcerated as a means of control in the wake of political organizing inside and outside of prisons in the 1960s and 1970s. 



  • Malcolm Chase, 1957-2020

    The social historian Malcolm Chase rejected “the enormous condescension of posterity” often to be found in history written by the educated rich.