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New York Times



  • What the 1619 Project Really Means

    by Timothy Messer-Kruse

    Professor Timothy Messer-Kruse argues that critics from both ends of the political spectrum have misunderstood the project.



  • 1619 and All That

    by Alex Lichtenstein

    "What is odd about the letter is that it implies that the singular problem with the 1619 Project is that journalists are practicing history without a license."


  • 1,056 Feet: Why I Needed the 1619 Project Growing Up

    by Derek Litvak

    The 1619 Project is not interested in retelling America’s founding story. It seeks to forge a new one. The people who contributed to this effort know full well those like myself, who grew up in the drainage ditches of America, in the long shadow of a bright star, need to hear this history. Demands to “stick to the facts” often sideline or silence our story. 



  • A Matter of Facts

    by Sean Wilentz

    The New York Times’ 1619 Project launched with the best of intentions, but has been undermined by some of its claims.



  • The Fight Over the 1619 Project Is Not About the Facts

    by Adam Serwer

    A dispute between a small group of scholars and the authors of The New York Times Magazine’s issue on slavery represents a fundamental disagreement over the trajectory of American society.


  • James Madison Responds to Sean Wilentz

    by Alan Singer

    The Electoral College may not have been expressly designed only to protect African slavery, but based on Madison’s notes, it was the mode most preferred by pro-slavery forces.



  • More coverage for Ben Urwand's Hollywood & Hitler book

    Ben Urwand has apparently done what no historian has previously been able to do: Draw not just one but many substantial links between 1930s Hollywood and the Nazi Germany regime of Adolf Hitler.Urwand's revelations were first revealed in a June issue of online monthly Tablet. According to The New York Times, "that the German government meddled in the film industry during Hollywood's so-called golden age has long been known to film historians ... But Mr. Urwand, 35, offers the most stinging take by far, drawing on material from German and American archives to argue that the relationship between Hollywood and the Third Reich ran much deeper — and went on much longer — than any scholar has so far suggested."...