;

immigration



  • The U.S. Role in the El Mozote Massacre Echoes in Today’s Immigration

    by Nelson Rauda and John Washington

    Renewed efforts to prosecute the perpetrators of the 1981 El Mozote massacre of Salvadoran civilians during the civil war will further demonstrate American involvement in the perpetuation of inequality and violence in Central America and, the authors argue, the hypocrisy of US immigration policy. 



  • How the Modern NRA Was Born at the Border

    by Sierra Pettengill and Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

    Sierra Pettengill's new short documentary "The Rifleman" connects racist violence at the US-Mexico border and the politics of influential NRA leader Harlon Carter, who for decades concealed the fact that he was convicted at age 17 of murder for shooting a Mexican youth in Laredo. She discusses that story with historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz.



  • Thirty Years after Mount Pleasant Erupted, a Push for Better Treatment Persists

    by Mike Amezcua

    Central American refugees living in Washington's Mount Pleasant neighborhood had fled US-backed repression but found harsh treatment by immigration authorities and local police. In 1991 frustration erupted. Today, the unrest still raises questions about citizenship and belonging. 



  • The Original Sin of America’s Broken Immigration Courts

    A decision made by Franklin Roosevelt to move immigration services from jurisdiction of the Department of Labor to the Department of Justice laid the groundwork for criminalizing immigration and for abusive practices that came to light in the most recent administration. 



  • Racism Has Always Been Part of the Asian American Experience

    by Mae Ngai

    Anti-Asian racism draws from different historical origins than Jim Crow, but their histories are part of the same conflict: whether White Americans are entitled to rule over other people, domestically or globally. 


  • What Do John Dewey's Century-Old Thoughts on Anti-Asian Bigotry Teach Us?

    by Charles F. Howlett

    A century ago, the American philosopher and educator took a sabattical to China and concluded that, if encouraged to learn about other cultures, White Americans could be brought to acceptance of Asian Americans and other immigrants as equal participants in democracy. COVID-inspired bigotry shows this dream remains unrealized.



  • America Never Wanted the Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses

    by Caitlin Dickerson

    Historian David Romo says that racist nativism is "ingrained in the culture and in the laws that are produced by that culture," but concealed by myths of a nation welcoming to immigrants. Also cited: Rose Cuison-Villazor, Daniel Tichenor, Mae Ngai, Donna Gabaccia and Adam Goodman. 



  • Letters From an American, March 13, 2021

    by Heather Cox Richardson

    What are the historical underpinnings of the immigration system, and what do politicians really mean by invoking a "border crisis"? 



  • A Path to Citizenship for 11 Million Immigrants is a No-Brainer

    by A. K. Sandoval-Strausz

    The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act showed the effectiveness of a large-scale amnesty for undocumented immigrants and reflected a reasonable and pragmatic approach to normalizing the status of immigrants as workers and community members. It should be remembered as a success and a model. 



  • My Brother’s Keeper

    by Ada Ferrer

    Historian Ada Ferrer offers her own family history of separation and reunification around the Cuban revolution.