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war on terror



  • The Coming of a Social-Distancing Version of War

    by Danny Sjursen

    With U.S. troops still fighting in Somalia, former West Point history instructor Danny Sjursen takes a deep dive into the future of American war in a Covid-19 world.



  • Celebrated to Death: Memorial Day Is Killing Us

    by Erik Edstrom

    It should be our civic responsibility to change the forces that guide this nation. We must redefine what patriotism and national security truly stand for. 


  • The Original War on Terror

    by Eric Laursen

    A review of Nunzio Pernicone and Fraser M. Ottanelli, Assassins against the Old Order: Italian Anarchist Violence in Fin de Siècle Europe.



  • New Interactive Tool Maps the American War on Terror

    by Stephanie Savell

    In general, the American public has largely ignored these post-9/11 wars and their costs. But the vastness of Washington’s counterterror activities suggests, now more than ever, that it’s time to pay attention.



  • Advice Too Secret to Ignore

    by Tom Engelhardt

    Col. Manners Answers Your Questions on CIA Practices, Proper Cyberwar Behavior, and Invasion Etiquette



  • “Bride and Boom!”

    by Tom Engelhardt

    We’re number one... in obliterating wedding parties.


  • The American Way of Manners

    by Tom Engelhardt

    Col. Manners answers your questions on the etiquette of war, nuclear threats, and surveillance.



  • Louis René Beres: Beyond Good and Evil in U.S. Counterterrorism Policies

    Louis René Beres is a professor of Political Science at Purdue UniversityAll of America's national security strategy on counterterrorism is based, in part, on a single core assumption: that our terrorist enemies are plainly and uniformly "abnormal." Significantly, however, such presumptively stark polarities between normal and abnormal, good and evil, represent a debilitating caricature. In order to better understand and combat these enemies, we must first learn to acknowledge that even "normal" individuals can sometimes do us great harm.What does this mean? By definition, at least, psychopathology and normalcy would appear to be mutually exclusive. Yet some of our most insightful thinkers have reasoned otherwise. In these examples, they have willingly looked beyond the seductive veneers of orthodox psychological investigation.Sigmund Freud wrote about the "Psychopathology of Everyday Life" (1914) while tracing some intriguing connections between "the abnormal" and "the normal," and was genuinely surprised to learn just how faint the line of demarcation could be. More precisely, in exploring parapraxes, or slips of the tongue, a phenomenon that we now conventionally call "Freudian slips," he concluded that certain psychopathologic traits could occasionally be discovered in normal persons....

  • Writing About the Military Will Screw with Your Life

    by Nick Turse

     “Why the officer stopped you is beyond me, but what the officer discovered is something of interest, especially for national security... It’s not every day you see someone traveling with information like this.”