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Southern history



  • How the Welfare State Became the Neoliberal Order (Review)

    by Pablo Pryluka

    Although the Tennessee Valley Authority was a pioneering public works project, its alumni worked in Latin America to advance redevelopment projects that elevated the authority of big business, a model now associated with the neoliberal turn in the developed world. 



  • The New Southern Strategy

    The rise of a new generation of Black mayors in Southern cities may signal a new political dynamic as municipal governments draw energy from protest movements and improvise ways to meet public needs, if conservative state governments don't stop them. 



  • The South’s Fight for White Supremacy

    by Jon Meacham

    Edward Alfred Pollard launched the "Lost Cause" mythology with an 1866 book whose legacy has endured as an emphatic defense of white supremacy.



  • My Confederate Past

    by Stuart Stevens

    I ask myself now why did it take so long for me to realize what it might be like for nearly 40 percent of my state to go to school and work under a flag that represented a cause dedicated to the right to own their ancestors? 


  • “A Very Different Story”: Marian Sims and Reconstruction

    by David B. Parker

    Marian Sims's 1942 historical novel Beyond Surrender was not nearly as popular as Gone with the Wind. But it reminds us today of a history that might have been--both during Reconstruction and in the popular portrayal of the period.



  • Ahmaud Arbery Holds Us Accountable

    by Jim Barger

    Nobody belonged to the salt marshes of coastal Georgia more than Ahmaud Arbery. His family’s roots there run more than 200 years deep. A native of those same marshes writes about who Ahmaud was, how well he was loved, and what his community must reckon with in the wake of his murder.


  • What to do about COVID? Start by Listening to People

    by Rachel F. Seidman

    An oral historian of medical care in the South observes that the current crisis shows weaknesses in the fabric of society that would have long been obvious to policymakers if they were more inclined to listen to ordinary people.