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teaching history



  • Canada is Going through its Own History Wars

    by Ian Rocksborough-Smith

    "To what degree will well-established professional historians and scholars respond and engage with younger generations of activists, intellectuals and cultural workers adamant about centring the experiences of marginalized people?"



  • Columbus Day was a Battle in the 90's History Wars, Too

    by Cynthia C. Prescott

    "The History Wars of the 1990s can show us that compromise and accommodation can temporarily defuse controversy — but tempt us to postpone the harder work of seeking justice and truth."



  • School Board Meetings Get Wild

    Historian Adam Laats suggests that school board meetings are an accessible venue for conservative anger in the ongoing culture wars, but also help connect conservative think tanks to the grass roots. 



  • Misappropriating MLK in the Critical Race Theory Debate

    by Tyler D. Parry

    Selective readings of Martin Luther King's writing and speeches swap his radical critiques of capitalism, militarism and inequality for bland colorblindness. The fact is that "CRT" is deeply rooted in King's work, which was unpopular among white Americans in his own time. 



  • Violence Over Schools is Nothing New

    by Sherman Dorn

    "The history of education teaches us that violence surrounding democratic schooling is part of a recurring pattern and that we have a choice to passively accept or assertively confront violent impulses."



  • Teach the Truth About America's Less Than Glorious History

    by Richard T. Hughes

    "Not a single student in my class professed to know anything at all about this tragic chapter in our nation’s history. I shouldn’t have been surprised. We witness every day similar ignorance, coupled with a persistent reluctance to acknowledge our nation’s crimes."



  • Debate and Controversy are Essential to History Education

    by Robert Cohen and Sonia Murrow

    Claims that critical perspectives on US history are "divisive" or "disruptive" or teach students to "hate America" were wrong in the 1980s, and are being repeated today. Educators must be free to serve the needs of students to compare, evaluate and debate. 



  • AHA and OAH Join Coalition to Protect Integrity of History Education

    by James Grossman and Beth English

    "Ongoing partisan agitation around this issue will continue, provoked and sustained by a shrewdly organized and amply funded crusade that seeks to replace evidence-based history instruction with a whitewashed version of patriotism."



  • Teaching the 26th Amendment With The New York Times

    by Jennifer Frost

    A historian of the 26th Amendment offers a lesson plan for using newspapers as primary sources to teach how young Americans succeeded in lowering the voting age to 18. 



  • There's More War in the Classroom Than You Think

    by William Hitchcock and Meghan Herwig

    Whatever the causes of the decline in history enrollments, it's not because history departments have rejected the study of war and military history. 



  • Need to Do Better at Teaching 9/11 as History

    "The main split in the way Sept. 11 is taught, says Jeremy Stoddard, is whether to teach it as a memorial, or as an event that continues to have an effect on students’ lives."


  • Teaching "All Men are Created Equal" (Part II)

    by Jeff Schneider

    In the second part of this essay, a longtime teacher of American history maintains that a close reading of the Declaration of Independence makes it possible to discuss revolution and racism in a thoughtful way without intimidating either white students or students of color.