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womens history



  • Protest Delivered the Nineteenth Amendment

    The amendment, ratified a century ago, is often described as having “given” women the right to vote. It wasn’t a gift; it was a hard-won victory achieved after more than seventy years of suffragist agitation.



  • Congresswomen Of Color Have Always Fought Back Against Sexism

    by Dana Frank

    When he called Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez “crazy” and “out of her mind” because he didn’t like her politics, Ted Yoho was harking back to Edgar Berman’s narrative that a political woman who dares to speak up is constitutionally insane.



  • “For Those on Both Sides”: An Interview with Mary Ziegler about Abortion and the Law in America

    Recently, Florida State University law professor Mary Ziegler sat down with Nursing Clio to talk about her new book, Abortion and the Law in America: Roe v. Wade to the Present. The book illustrates how the question of “abortion rights” is only one piece of the puzzle – rather both antiabortion and pro-choice advocates have spent decades in a tug-of-war over policy, funding issues, and larger questions about public health.



  • Productivity Moves With Our Bodies

    by Ángela Vergara

    Researching the professional and familial lives of women scientists brought the author face to face with the impact of domestic and family obligations on women's academic work during COVID-19. 



  • Why Can’t Republicans Elect Women?

    The Republican Party has not matched the gains made by Democrats in seating women in Congress since the "Year of the Woman" in 1992. 



  • The Real Story Behind “Because of Sex”

    by Rebecca Onion

    One of the most powerful phrases in the Civil Rights Act is often viewed as a malicious joke that backfired. But its entrance into American law was far more savvy than that, led by Representative Martha Griffiths.



  • 12 Informative Queer Women's History Reads

    A selection of historical works examine the lives of queer women, the relationship of queer and racial identities, and the establishment of heterosexuality as a social norm.