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public history



  • Ksenia Coffman Corrects Nazi History on Wikipedia

    Wikipedian Ksenia Coffman, who has established herself as an expert at rooting out propaganda, Nazi apologetics and misinformation from the internet's encyclopedia, joins far-right watchdog Jared Holt to discuss her work and the tensions between accuracy and accessibility in online history.



  • Alabama's Capitol is a Crime Scene, with a 120 Year Coverup

    The Alabama Capitol in Montgomery was the first seat of the Confederate government and the place where white Democrats ratified a Jim Crow constitution in 1901. You'd learn little of this by touring the museum-like building. 



  • Who's Teaching Local History?

    Michael Oberg and Joel Helfrich of SUNY-Geneseo's Center for Local and Municipal History discuss connecting history students with local historians to unearth and tell their region's history.


  • Veracity or Virality? How Social Media are Transforming History

    by Jason Steinhauer

    History is a growing content category on social media, but history content going viral has very little to do with its quality or reliability. The author of a new book on history on social media says historians and readers need to understand how political agendas and content algorithms are shaping history on the web. 



  • Today's Culture Wars are Playing Out on Plantation Tours

    by Kelley Fanto Deetz

    "Museum professionals at plantations hear it all and must balance viewpoints that are diametrically opposed to one another, such as the romanticized notion of antebellum gentility and the constant fear of terror and violence of the enslaved."



  • New Orleans Urged to Rename Lee Boulevard after Music Legend Allen Toussaint

    “The City of New Orleans should prioritize celebrating our culture bearers, our diversity, and everything that makes our city special, not those who worked to tear us apart and represent a horrible history of racism that we are still dealing with today,” said City Councilor Jared Brossett.



  • Blair Mountain, West Virginia Still Shows the Grip of the Coal Industry

    “It was kind of weird growing up, knowing that there was a war fought here and nobody knew about it, and there’s no monuments to it,” Professor Chuck Keeney said. Others believe the story of the mine wars has been suppressed because it challenges the image of big coal as a benevolent force in the state. 



  • Virginia to Dismantle Lee Statue Plinth

    Outgoing Governor Ralph Northam will execute the removal of the pedestal and the transfer of the surrounding traffic circle to the City of Richmond before Glenn Youngkin succeeds him in office. 


  • DNA Testing Rescued Pearl Harbor's Dead from Patriotic Mythmaking

    by John Bodnar

    "When family members were asked for DNA samples and learned that long-lost loved ones might be coming home, they began to disclose to reporters aspects of the war’s legacy that had remained outside the glare of large public memorials and celebrations."



  • Rutgers Gets Mixed Results in Examining Connections to Slavery

    "Just five years after the debut of the Scarlet and Black Project—a reference to the university’s colors as well as the African Americans directly impacted by the history—many Rutgers students are unaware of the work, or their school's history."


  • What "Forget the Alamo" Forgets

    by James W. Russell

    "Forget the Alamo" is ultimately constrained by American unwillingness to fully deal with the reality that the US forcibly stole Texas and the southwest from Mexico.