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violence



  • A Parable of All-American Violence

    by Kelly Denton-Borhaug

    The United States cannot truly end the Afghan war without reckoning with the effects of normalizing violence as a means of politics. 



  • The 1906 Atlanta Race Massacre: How Fearmongering Led to Violence

    The 1906 Atlanta Race Riots, a series of mob attacks on Black residents and their homes and businesses, originated in fears of black political and economic power that were stoked by the local press with fabricated, sensational stories of Black criminality. 



  • The Migration Crisis is a Gendered Violence Crisis

    by Laura Briggs and María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo

    Central American women are frequently pushed to migrate by the threat of sexual violence. American policy inflicts further gendered harm through family separation and border militarization. 



  • Addressing Gun Violence Means Looking Beyond Policing

    by Menika Dirkson

    Between 1969 and 1976, Philadelphia saw success with a program to connect youth to social services, education and work opportunity, but turned toward militarized policing in the 1970s. This history should guide urban leaders away from the "tough on crime" approach.



  • The Unbearable Easiness of Killing

    by Arie M. Dubnov

    "As a colleague justly commented, it is only helpful to call a situation ‘complicated’ if one is committed to unfolding the package, willing to examine its contents and prepared to be surprised by what one finds hidden inside."



  • On Public Art, Historical Memory, and Racial Violence

    by Melanie Chambliss

    "Anniversaries are useful for focusing the public’s attention on historically significant events, including the Tulsa Race Massacre, but we must ask ourselves what happens next?"



  • Without Asian American Studies, We Can’t Understand American Racism

    by Min Hyoung Song

    The establishment of Asian American Studies and ethnic studies programs has been essential to putting Asian American scholars (and scholars of Asian Americans) in position to engage the mass media around events like the Atlanta shootings. As those programs are under fire, it's time to recognize their value. 


  • What Comes Next?

    by Stephanie Hinnershitz

    In 1979, Asian American leaders testified to Congress about problems of discrimination, opportunity and hostility facing their communities. The official response largely enshrined a "model minority" myth that obscured ongoing problems behind a celebratory narrative of inclusion. Waves of anti-Asian violence in the 1980s belied that story, and warn us not to minimize the climate of hostility Asian Americans face today.



  • Letters From an American: March 23, 2021

    by Heather Cox Richardson

    Beginning in the 1970s, the National Rifle Assocaition evolved into a political lobbying organization increasingly enmeshed with the conservative movement. Two recent mass shootings are a tribute to the organization's success. Congratulations.