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sports



  • Women’s College Sports Was Growing. Then the NCAA Took Over

    The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women was pushed aside by the NCAA as universities dedicated more resources to women's sports to comply with Title IX. Critics say that the NCAA has not followed through on the need for equity while squeezing out women coaches and athletic administrators.


  • Will the Supreme Court Uphold the NCAA's Version of Amateurism?

    by Ronald A. Smith

    A pending Supreme Court case will test whether the NCAA can bar student athletes from making money from products that make use of their images, a form of property right of "Name, Image, or Likeness." A historian who wrote an amicus brief says the NCAA's claim to protect the amateurism of the athletes is selective and hypocritical.



  • Historian Unjustly Forced to Walk the Plank

    by Michael E. Carter

    When a historian published an editoral about the history of piracy near Tampa Bay during Super Bowl Week, right-wing media took an effort to present historical knowledge as evidence of a liberal culture war, subjecting them to harassment and threats in their own cancel culture campaign. Is the goal to intimidate historians from weighing in? 



  • Japanese Internment, Football, and a Legendary Team

    Dave Zirin's Edge of Sports podcast hosts Bradford Pearson, the author of "The Eagles of Heart Mountain," the story of a group of interned Japanese American teens whose football team dominated the state of Wyoming. 



  • Henry Aaron and American Memory

    by Robert Greene II

    "The memories of Jackie Robinson and Henry Aaron, two Americans reviled by many of their compatriots during their playing days but embraced by virtually everyone now, are but the sports phase of a nationwide problem—the problem of properly remembering a painful past."



  • What Hank Aaron Told Me

    by Sandy Tolan

    The author received a touching reply to a fan letter he wrote Hank Aaron in 1972. Writing a book about Aaron years later, he realized he didn't know the half of the burdens Aaron carried in pursuit of baseball immortality. 


  • Historians Pay Tribute to Hank Aaron

    by HNN Staff

    Hank Aaron, an all-time great of baseball and for many years its all-time leader in home runs, passed away at age 86 on January 22. Historians recall him as a player, an advocate for civil rights inside and outside the game, and a man who was uneasy being made into a symbol of progress against racism.



  • Hank Aaron's 715th, Called by Vin Scully

    The baseball Hall of Famer and one-time home run leader died at age 86 on January 22. Here, watch his record-breaking 715th home run, as announced by broadcasting legend Vin Scully.



  • M.L.B. Will Add Negro Leagues to Official Records

    Major League Baseball will include player statistics from the seven African American baseball leagues operating between 1920 and 1948 in the major league record books in recognition of the quality of play and the opportunity denied the best Black players in the game's segregated era. 



  • Hinchliffe Stadium’s Comeback is a Home Run

    For Black Americans, the amphitheater-style stadium was home to and embodied the incredible spirit of Negro Leagues baseball. It will now be renovated so its story can be preserved.