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political violence



  • Premiere: Mississippi Justice

    The Bitter Southerner magazine and PBS's The American Experience partner on a short film that examines the plot to murder the civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner in 1964. 



  • America Is About to Enter its Years of Lead

    Donald Trump's Proud Boy supporters and other far-right groups may not be able to seize power, but they don't need to. Political science research on episodes of political violence shows that creating and maintaining tension around the possibility of violence can intimidate the left, encourage law enforcement crackdown, and manipulate public opinion. 



  • War Zone America? Perspectives on a Riven Nation from a Worried Military Spouse

    by Andrea Mazzarino

    These days, when I watch the news and see clashes among the police, Black Lives Matter protesters, far-right “militias,” and Antifa supporters, I’m often reminded that just because no one’s declared a civil war begun, doesn’t mean we aren’t staring at the makings of an armed conflict.



  • Our Long, Forgotten History of Election-Related Violence

    by Jelani Cobb

    A weather forecast is not a prediction of the inevitable. We are not doomed to witness a catastrophic tempest this fall, but anyone who is paying attention knows that the winds have begun to pick up. 



  • Terror and Technology, From Dynamite to Drones (Review)

    Audrey Cronin's new book warns that terrorist networks are less likely to employ cutting-edge technology than to adapt widely-available tools to new destructive ends; security experts are still surprised by this repeating pattern. 



  • The Double Standard of the American Riot

    by Kellie Carter Jackson

    Many people are asking if violence is a valid means of producing social change. The hard and historical answer is yes. Riots have a way of magnifying not merely the flaws in the system, but also the strength of those in power. 



  • Louis René Beres: What Does It Mean to Kill for a Cause?

    Louis René Beres is a professor of political science at Purdue University and the author of multiple books.Before any country can fashion an effective counter-terrorism policy, it needs a clear and purposeful understanding of "the enemy." For the United States, especially after discovering so-many behavioral contradictions in the Boston Marathon bombers, an underlying task must be to look more closely and explicitly at issues of normalcy. On the cover of yesterday's Rolling Stone, for instance (which was the source of widespread outcry) Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is both "glamorously" posed and called a "monster."Is it correct to assume that all or most of this country's terrorist foes are "abnormal"? Or does such a position ultimately hinder our urgent national security efforts? Would such an assumption represent little more than a ritualized political obligation -- a purely self-serving and ideologically obligatory policy stance -- or might it still be the considered outcome of rock solid and objective psychological science?