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monuments



  • Amid the Monument Wars, a Rally for ‘More History’

    “Historians have different views on taking down statues,” said Gregory Downs, a professor at the University of California, Davis, and one of the organizers. “But that debate doesn’t really capture what historians do, which is to bring more history.”



  • My Local Confederate Monument

    by Casey Cep

    The author examines the history and politics of the last remaining Confederate monument on public lands, other than battlefields and cemeteries, in the state of Maryland. 



  • Eisenhower Memorial, Delayed by Design Disputes, Opens This Week

    The opening of the Eisenhower monument in 2020 may make many mindful of the contrast between Ike and the current head of the Republican Party, although the memorial's design has already sparked a bitter battle that fits the temper of our times. 



  • Civil War History: A Call to Action

    The Journal of the Civil War Era urges historians to mobilize on September 26 to correct the misinformation delivered by public monuments and memorials.   



  • Voltaire Spread Darkness, Not Enlightenment. France Should Stop Worshipping Him.

    by Nabila Ramdani

    Nabila Ramdani argues that the French Enlightenment thinker's abstract defenses of free speech and inquiry should not overshadow the concrete content of what he said and wrote, which included historically influential racist and antisemitic bigotry cloaked in the language of reason and science.



  • DC Releases Long List of Facilities to Be Renamed, Relocated, or Contextualized

    A commission convened by DC Mayor Muriel Bowser recommends that the District rename many schools and city facilities that honor historical figures associated with slavery and racism, and asks the city government to pressure the federal government to do the same with federal properties in the district. 


  • Gettysburg’s First Confederate Monument

    by David K. Graham

    The dedication in 1886 of a monument to the Maryland 2nd Confederate Regiment at Gettysburg launched the movement by southern partisans to lay claim to the site of the Union victory as a monument to national reconciliation. The Grand Army of the Republic organization wasn't buying it then, and we shouldn't today.