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Reconstruction



  • Alabama's Capitol is a Crime Scene, with a 120 Year Coverup

    The Alabama Capitol in Montgomery was the first seat of the Confederate government and the place where white Democrats ratified a Jim Crow constitution in 1901. You'd learn little of this by touring the museum-like building. 



  • State Standards are Failing to Teach Reconstruction and Erasing the Black Freedom Struggle

    by Ana Rosado, Gideon Cohn-Postar and Mimi Eisen

    A common thread connecting public ignorance of American history and the politicization of history curricula is the systemic erasure of the history of Reconstruction. This report considers how states currently mandate the teaching of the era and what they could do better. 



  • The Right's 1877 Project

    Helen Andrews's recent "American Conservative" column revives the myths that Reconstruction was a "tragic era" and that Black disenfranchisement was a force for progress, troubling indicators of the current right's views of democracy. 



  • Ghosts of Mississippi

    by Charles M. Blow

    The Times columnist argues that the oral arguments in the SCOTUS abortion case recall the bitter history of disenfranchisement in Mississippi, and the subsequent decades when rights were stripped away from Mississippians without democratic process.



  • Searching for Descendants of Racist Terrorism

    Wilmington, North Carolina resident Tim Pinnick has partnered with the Equal Justice Initiative and numerous volunteers to try to locate every living descendant of the victims of the white supremacist coup that overthrew the city's biracial government in 1898. 



  • Bouie: America Punishes Only a Certain Kind of Rebel

    by Jamelle Bouie

    Impunity for the leaders of the Confederacy enabled the bloody overthrow of Reconstruction and the reestablishment of white supremacy. The mistake must not be repeated for the January 6 riots. 



  • The Reconstruction Origins of "Black Wall Street"

    by Alexandra E. Stern

    Understanding Tulsa's Black Wall Street as a product of the rise and fall of Reconstruction helps to think more productively about how the Tulsa massacre speaks to the policy problems of racial justice. 



  • Our 250-Year Fight for Multiracial Democracy

    The 1829 Virginia Constitutional Convention offers a lens onto the profoundly anti-democratic views held by many of the founding generation. We deal with the same hostility toward majority rule today. 



  • America’s Political Roots Are in Eutaw, Alabama

    "The terror campaign of 1870 ended the promise of Alabama’s brief Reconstruction era, allowing the so-called Redeemers to pry Alabama from the hands of reform. This was the critical juncture that led to the way things are."



  • Time to Stop the Whitewash

    by Joseph R. Fitzgerald

    If having a national, unifying narrative of history is necessary to hold civil society together, it can't be a story that erases inequality, conflict and struggle.