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books



  • ‘The Code’ Review: How Green Was the Valley

    by Randall Stross

    As late as the early 1970s, Northern California seemed a long-shot candidate for the center of the computerized universe. A review of Margaret O’Mara's The Code. 



  • Her Book in Limbo, Naomi Wolf Fights Back

    After her American publisher delayed her new book, “Outrages,” over accuracy concerns, she is responding with a strategy mixing scholarly peer review and damage control.


  • A Fresh Take on Watergate Illuminates the Present

    by James Thornton Harris

    While Richard Nixon’s rise and fall has been repeatedly examined — there are more than a dozen biographies of him — John Farrell’s book, Richard Nixon, a Life, offers many new insights.



  • Three Recent Books Examine Frederick Douglass' Legacy

    by Allis Radosh

    Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet by D.H. Dilbeck, Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man by Timothy Sandefur, and Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom by David W. Blight all offer a different interpretation of Douglass. 



  • The Troubling History of Psychiatry

    Challenges to the legitimacy of the profession have forced it to examine itself, including the fundamental question of what constitutes a mental disorder.


  • Into the Teeth of the Dragon’s Jaw in Vietnam

    by Erik Moshe

    The Thanh Hoa, or “Dragon’s Jaw” bridge was one tough target to crack for war strategists and military pilots during the Vietnam War. Erik Moshe interviewed the authors of Dragon's Jaw to learn more. 



  • Sarah Knott Looks at Pregnancy and Mothering Through the Ages

    Knott, a professor at Indiana University, uses her own path to motherhood, which includes a miscarriage and two successful pregnancies, as the scaffolding for her engaging and pleasingly radical “unconventional history” of this subject.