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civil rights


  • A House Still Divided (Part 1)

    by Walter G. Moss

    The core of our polarization is a disagreement about what kind of country we will be – one dominated by Christian white men or one, in Frederick Douglass's words, "of perfect civil equality to the people of all races and of all creeds, and to men of no creeds." 



  • Martin Luther King Knew: Fighting Racism Meant Fighting Police Brutality

    by Jeanne Theoharis

    Despite contemporary efforts to portray contemporary movements like Black Lives Matter and radical groups like the Black Panther Party as deviators from the "respectable" movement led by MLK, the SCLC leader insisted on the need to combat police brutality despite the unpopularity of that position,



  • How Civil Rights Pioneer Bob Moses Changed Math Education

    "More than a decade after the 1965 Voting Rights Act, Moses realized that the next frontier was economic justice, and that fluency in math and science was the springboard for peoples of color and low-income whites to be full citizens, fully enfranchised—the civil rights issue of the 21st century."



  • NC Teacher: Don't Give In to GOP Politics of Fear

    by Anne P. Beatty

    "To retreat from open, honest discussions about race and history is the last thing we should do. To retreat is to give into the fear mongering of this bill. Its goal is our silence."



  • An American Conception of Justice

    by Michael Kazin

    While historians have demonstrated the racist operation of American institutions, it's important to recognize that those institutions have also been instruments for justice. 



  • What Gloria Richardson Taught Me

    by Joseph R. Fitzgerald

    The late Gloria Richardson's career as an organizer, activist, and thinker in the Black Freedom movement hold lessons for how Congressional Democrats can and must advance new voting rights protections. 



  • The Complicated History of One Mississippi Restaurant

    Booker Wright, a Black waiter, shocked the community of Greenwood by shedding his genial tableside manner to tell a documentary crew about the burdens of racial subordination. After the film aired, he was assaulted by a police officer and his bar was vandalized.



  • Myles Horton, Highlander, and the Beloved Community

    by Robert Hunt Ferguson

    "Founded in 1932, the original Highlander Folk School served as an incubator for many of the important ideas that shaped twentieth-century social movements."