;

Native American history



  • Native on TV in 2021

    by Liza Black

    "Where 20th- and early 21st-century shows used Native characters in superficial ways, perhaps to create an appearance of diversity, Reservation Dogs and Rutherford Falls center Indigenous characters, themes, and content, decolonizing conventional television narratives about Native people."


  • The Value of a "Greater Chaco" National Park

    by Richard Moe

    President Biden's decision to create a buffer zone around the Chaco Culture National Park protects not just a natural landscape but a potentially priceless trove of yet-to-be discovered artifacts and sites sacred to Native people today. 



  • Nevada Governor Apologizes for State's Role in Indigenous Schools

    "Descendants of Paiute, Washoe and Shoshone people who attended the Stewart School during the 90 years it was in operation told stories of bounties being offered to bring Native children to the school; of students attempting to run away due to starvation; and of extreme overcrowding in dormitories."


  • Honoring Memory of the Sand Creek Massacre in the Age of COVID

    by Billy J. Stratton

    The community of descendants of the Sand Creek Massacre maintain rituals of healing that honor the dead while affirming bonds of community that have been tested by a long history of dispossession and the recent trauma of the COVID-19 pandemic.



  • The Storm over the American Revolution

    by Eric Herschthal

    By shoehorning his recent book on the Revolutionary War into the space of the debate about slavery and the founding, critics of Woody Holton are missing important points about the importance of indigenous land to the founding and the global context of colonial independence.



  • What Slavery Looked Like in the West

    by Kevin Waite

    "Historians typically study Black and Native slavery as discrete systems. But America’s wealthiest slaveholders didn’t draw a fixed line."



  • Are Native Land Acknowledgments Empty Gestures?

    by Graeme Wood

    Too often, says Atlantic writer Graeme Wood, the rote ackowledgment by a speaker that an event is taking place on land historically occupied by an indigenous people is an empty gesture that short-circuits discussion of Native demands.



  • Rethinking Afro-Indigenous History in the United States

    by Kyle T. Mays

    A historian argues for rethinking the cultural practices of enslaved Africans and their encounters with Native Americans by considering that both were, in a sense, "indigenous" resistance to the European settler-colonialist agenda. 



  • Canada is Going through its Own History Wars

    by Ian Rocksborough-Smith

    "To what degree will well-established professional historians and scholars respond and engage with younger generations of activists, intellectuals and cultural workers adamant about centring the experiences of marginalized people?"



  • Traumatic Monologues: The Therapeutic Turn in Indigenous Politics

    by Melanie K. Yazzie

    American and Canadian politicians are happy to promote initiatives based in psychological understandings that "trauma" is the principal source of Native disadvantage, while ignoring the ongoing colonial exploitation of indigenous lands by the oil and gas industries.



  • Few Remember the Worst Slaughter of Native Americans in US History

    The Army killed about 350 members of the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone in present-day Idaho 1863. Racism against natives, the banality of such attacks, and the mass carnage of the Civil War overshadowed the massacre; the efforts of Shoshone have ensured it was not forgotten.



  • California Ski Resort to Change Racist, Sexist Name

    "In modern usage, the word "squaw" is considered to be "offensive, derogatory, racist, and misogynistic," the resort, formerly known as Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, said as it explained its reasoning."