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1960s


  • 1968: A Year of Dashed Hopes

    by Walter G. Moss

    While people seek to confront life's challenges with hope and courage and banish fear and doubt, some years, like 1968, don't make that easy. 


  • Ukraine Evokes Past "Eve of Destruction"

    by Richard Aquila

    In 1960s America, popular songs gradually roused the conscience of many Americans against the war in Vietnam. What forces might make Russia (as well as Ukraine and the west) push away from the brink of unthinkable acts mass destruction? 



  • When Eartha Kitt Disrupted the Ladies Who Lunch

    In 1968, real life imitated "Batman" as the Catwoman actress broke the veneer of politeness at a luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson to denounce the war against Vietnam. But while Catwoman always got away, Kitt's career was destroyed for a decade.



  • Todd Gitlin's Work Against the Dark

    by Jeffrey C. Isaac

    As an activist and later a chronicler of Students for a Democratic Society, Todd Gitlin shaped the path and the legacy of the New Left. 



  • Utopia’s Settler Colonialism Problem

    by Jessica Namakkal

    The commune movements of the 1960s counterculture were organized around a number of pernicious assumptions about indigenous people and the prerogatives of whites to settle and reorganize land. 



  • The Revolution that Wasn't: What did 1960s Radicals Achieve?

    by Michael Kazin

    A new book of narrative history of the 1960s New Left repeats a common error: mistaking rhetoric for revolution and ignoring a key outcome of the decade: that the right emerged more powerful, argues reviewer Michael Kazin. 



  • The Real Black Panthers

    Historian Donna Murch joins NPR's The Throughline to discuss the Black Panther Party's agenda and its targeting by J. Edgar Hoover's FBI. 


  • Don't Erase Women's Leadership in the Berkeley Free Speech Movement

    by Robert Cohen

    Historians have yet to fully examine the role of women in leadership and at the grass roots of the Berkeley Free Speech Movement. Even some of the best and most insightful accounts of the FSM treat it as a movement of men and ignore the key roles of Jackie Goldberg, Bettina Aptheker and others. 



  • The Plan to Build a Capital for Black Capitalism

    Thomas Healy's book "Soul City" looks at a short-lived experiment to create a capital city for Black capitalism in America, part of a long series of political debates about whether the pursuit of economic power by Black Americans would overcome racism. 



  • Rewinding Jimi Hendrix’s National Anthem

    "Jimi’s Woodstock anthem was both an expression of protest at the obscene violence of a wholly unnecessary war and an affirmation of aspects of the American experiment entirely worth fighting for."



  • New Memoir Tells Tale Of 1967 Beer Run To Vietnam

    John "Chick" Donohue was in a bar in Inwood in upper Manhattan in 1967 when the bartender suggested the neighborhood's contingent of troops in Vietnam would appreciate a beer. He made the delivery. His new book explains how. 



  • The Long Shadow of Racial Fascism

    by Alberto Toscano

    Black thinkers have long argued that racial slavery created its own unique form of American fascism.