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voting rights



  • How the Black Vote Became a Monolith

    by Theodore R. Johnson

    Despite the political diversity within Black America, the political system's accommodation of bigotry and the political utility of appeals to white identity have pushed the overwhelming majority of Black voters to cast ballots for the same party. 



  • In 2020, Voting Rights are on the Ballot

    by Peniel Joseph

    Black citizenship remains the best yardstick to measure the nation’s democratic health, and even before the coronavirus pandemic, the Black vote in large parts of the country remained imperiled.



  • The Supreme Court’s Starring Role In Democracy’s Demise

    by Carol Anderson

    The Supreme Court today repeats the shameful actions of the courts in the 1890s, which gave judicial cover to state laws explicitly designed to disenfranchise Black voters, by accepting bad faith arguments that the laws in question were race-neutral. 



  • So Far Away from 1965

    by Julian Zelizer

    By the early 1980s, a new generation opposed to African American political participation was resurrecting the old bromide of “voter fraud” in what would eventually become a successful attack on the VRA.



  • Fannie Lou Hamer Risked Her Life for the Right to Vote

    Fannie Lou Hamer suffered unspeakable violence and intimidation at the hands of white supremacists and police to demand the right to vote, and challenged the Democratic Party to reject its southern segregationist branch in 1964.



  • Fannie Lou Hamer’s Dauntless Fight for Black Americans’ Right to Vote

    by Keisha N. Blain

    As Hamer and her Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party colleagues pointed out to the 1964 Democratic National Convention, a “whites-only” Democratic Party representing a state in which one out of five residents were black undermined the very notion of representative democracy. 



  • The Improbable Journey of the Suffragist Sash

    by Hilary Levey Friedman

    The sash embodies the suffragists’ vision of womanhood — one that was simultaneously progressive and regressive.  That vision helped move women into the public and political spheres, but it did so by emphasizing their appearance.