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far right



  • Ultras: The Rise of America's Far Right (Review)

    by Kim Phillips-Fein

    Kim Phillips-Fein reviews John Huntington's "Far-Right Vanguard," calling his history of the far right a needed reminder of the porousness of boundaries between the right-wing fringe and mainstream conservatism in the 20th century. 



  • The Shock Troops of the Next Big Lie

    by Katherine Stewart

    A historian of the religious right argues that the movement has recently integrated the Trumpist myth of stolen elections into its political mobilization of evangelical pastors. 



  • Why Didn't January 6 Force Moderation on the Republicans?

    "So there was a moment after January 6, where it seemed like the right was ready to disown Trump. They were ready to disown everybody who was involved in January 6. And for all kinds of reasons that was a very brief window that didn’t last."



  • Tracing the Origins of Today's Archconservatives (Review)

    by Randall J. Stephens

    "John Huntington convincingly concludes that Trump 'tapped into the government mistrust, racial resentment, and conspiratorial beliefs that had festered within conservatism for decades'."



  • We All Live in the John Birch Society's World Now

    Edward Miller's new book presents the case that the John Birch Society was not a retrograde reactionary force but the vanguard of modern conservative culture war politics. 



  • Can Universities Counter the Global Tide of Nationalism?

    by Emily J. Levine

    Nationalism and a growing rivalry with China have pushed some politicians to reconsider the openness of American universities to foreign students. The history of academic exchange suggests this may be a mistake. 



  • Extremism Didn't Begin with Trump, and Won't End with Him Either

    by Joseph Lowndes

    Pat Buchanan never succeeded in winning the Republican nomination, but he did as much as anyone to shape the politics of grievance and the image of beseiged white America that drives the party's base today. 



  • The Apocalypse Never Dies, It Just Gets Weirder

    by Thomas Lecaque

    "Not only has the apocalypticism of the last few years not died out, but things aren’t getting better." A historian considers the intensification of apocalyptic rhetoric in American evangelicalism, and its fusion with the Trumpist political movement.