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conspiracy theories


  • Originally published 11/20/2017

    The JFK assassination files lead back to Seattle

    A University of Washington professor says that one of the doctors who worked on JFK’s body admitted that one shot was from the front not behind him. But that's not what the doctor told Gerald Posner.

  • Originally published 11/06/2017

    JFK files say rumors of CIA link to Oswald ‘unfounded’

    A 1975 CIA memo says a thorough search of agency records in and outside the United States was conducted to determine whether Oswald had been used by the agency or connected with it in "any conceivable way." The memo said the search came up empty.

  • Originally published 10/30/2017

    Scraping the bottom of the barrel

    Dale K. Myers

    The latest JFK assassination files leave the media scrambling for something - anything - newsworthy.

  • Originally published 10/30/2017

    The One Thing All Americans Agree On: JFK Conspiracy

    The latest numbers from Gallup, from a 2013 survey taken to mark the 50th anniversary of the event, showed 61% of Americans believed the assassination was a conspiracy, while 30% believed Oswald acted alone.

  • Originally published 10/26/2017

    How to Read the JFK Assassination Files

    The government is releasing thousands of long-secret files on Kennedy’s murder. Here are some tips for making sense of all the code names, redactions and confusing jargon.

  • Originally published 09/02/2015

    A history professor explains why Americans are so prone to conspiracy theories

    Historically, conspiracy theories have often focused on orchestrated wrongdoings supposedly perpetrated by big business or government on ordinary citizens. But recent conspiracy theories have focused on the victims and their loved ones as key players in the manipulation of the public. What has changed?

  • Originally published 07/08/2013

    Roswell Incident at 66

    “THE INTELLIGENCE OFFICE of the 509th Bombardment group at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today, that the field has come into possession of a flying saucer.”That first paragraph out of Roswell was worthy of Orson Welles — as if an extraterrestrial tale told in stentorian tones. It was the paragraph that launched not only a news article, but also a cultural curiosity that continues to spark conversation and controversy to this day — as if attracting UFO buffs and conspiracy theorists by magnetic pull from the world over.“RAAF Captures Flying Saucer / On Ranch in Roswell Region,” blared the bold headline on that front page of the Roswell (N.M.) Daily Record. The date atop the page: July 8....

  • Originally published 06/13/2013

    Lawsuit: Amelia Earhart's plane found in 2010, discovery concealed

    The group conducting a search for Amelia Earhart's plane strongly denied charges they had found the aircraft in 2010 and hid it from donors.Timothy Mellon, the son of philanthropist Paul Mellon and a major contributor to The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery sued the group on June 3, alleging TIGHAR found the famed airplane in a 2010 expedition, then hid the news so it could keep fundraising.Mellon donated $1 million that helped fund the 2012 expedition that may have indeed turned up the long-awaited evidence of Earhart's plane.Ric Gillespie, the executive director of TIGHAR, called the lawsuit frivolous....

  • Originally published 05/22/2013

    America’s fluoride wars

    “A few things remain constant in America – death, taxes, baseball and, since the 1950s, widespread, often successful efforts by a passionate minority to keep fluoride out of drinking water,” Donald R. McNeil wrote in Wilson Quarterly. McNeil has written one of the more complete histories of the fluoridation wars that I was able to find. It starts on Jan. 26, 1945 when the city of Grand Rapids, Mich. became the first city to fluoridate its water supply. It was meant to be a public health experiment, to test whether fluoridation could protect against tooth decay, especially among younger children.It would take decades to have any results and, therefore, ”the pioneers of fluoridation were generally a cautious lot,” McNeil writes, noting that they thought “that communities should at first fluoridate only on a test-batch basis.”...

  • Originally published 04/01/2013

    When Anthony Lewis stood up to the New York Times and the Clinton crazies

    With the passing of legendary New York Times newsman Anthony Lewis this week, observers have noted that his lasting legacy will likely be his clarion insights and logical, lucid writing style that helped make the courts and the law more accessible for everyday news consumers. From his two Pulitzer Prizes for reporting, to his opinion column which he wrote for more than three decades, Lewis' imprint on the Times was vast.