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Democratic Party


  • Is the Republican Party Willing to Purge its Extremists?

    by Jeff Kolnick

    Beginning in the 1920s, the Democratic Party began the long, difficult, and politically costly process of dissociation from white supremacy. Do today's Republicans who claim to reject extremism have the courage to do the same?



  • Rescuing Shirley Chisholm's Life from Symbolism

    by Anastasia Curwood

    Writing a biography of the Congresswoman and presidential candidate required working through the distinction between Shirley Chisholm the symbol and the much more complex reality of Shirley Chisholm the woman, to see how big trends in Black history unfolded at a human scale.



  • Are the Dems Doomed?

    by Julian Zelizer

    The Democrats are leaving themselves open to taking the blame at the polls for the war in Ukraine and high gas prices and the inevitable next wave of the COVID pandemic. 



  • Nicole Hemmer Reviews Martin and Burns's "This Will Not Pass"

    by Nicole Hemmer

    The book by two political reporters portrays the dire contrast between a Republican Party willing to do anything to hold power between November 2020 and January 2021 and a Democratic Party enmeshed in business-as-usual. 



  • We're Facing the Results of the Dems' Retreat from Secularism

    by Jacques Berlinerblau

    By trying to match the Republicans on bringing Christian faith into policy, Democrats abandoned the difficult but necessary struggles to define how a diverse society protects religious freedom for majority and minority faiths – and those of no faith. 



  • Why the End of Roe Isn't Likely to Energize the Democrats

    by Natalie Shure

    Until the Democratic Party and its pro-choice supporters decide to take action to fix the fact that abortion restrictions are already harming poor and working-class women, they are unlikely to win elections based on their nominal support for abortion rights. 



  • Thanatos Triumphant

    by Mike Davis

    Russian's invasion of Ukraine has revealed the nihilism of the world's leaders from Moscow to Washington, and the failure of the American left to develop a meaningful alternative to a global death-wish led by oligarchs.



  • Michael Kazin Asks: What Defines the Democratic Party?

    by Sam Rosenfield

    Kazin's new history of the Democrats examines broad ideas of economic fairness that resonate with the party's faithful, but also the pattern of lurching compromise and triangulation that frustrates its progressive critics. 



  • If the Dems Turn to the Center, They Will Lose to Trump

    by Samuel Moyn

    In the wake of the Virginia gubernatorial election, centrist Democrats have revived calls for austerity as the only safe electoral strategy. They will find out how wrong that analysis is if they are successful in pulling the Biden administration away from a broad agenda. 



  • Dems' Unity Problems Nothing New

    "Throughout its history, the party has featured dissent and even radical differences of viewpoint. It has been defined by these internal contrasts and conflicts as often as by its achievements."



  • Why Are Moderate Dems Trying to Blow Up Biden's Economic Plan?

    by Zachary D. Carter

    Centrists' efforts to chisel away at the Build Back Better bill threaten its passage, its effectiveness, and the prospects of Democrats to hold power in the future. A biographer of John Maynard Keynes wonders why they're doing it. 



  • An American Conception of Justice

    by Michael Kazin

    While historians have demonstrated the racist operation of American institutions, it's important to recognize that those institutions have also been instruments for justice. 



  • How Democrats Lost the Courts

    "Some Democrats are starting to suspect that the story is simpler: They’ve been chumps. They have clung to norms Republicans long ago abandoned. They have championed moderates in order to appeal to their enemies, only to watch those moderates twist in the wind."