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inequality



  • Against Returning to Normal

    by David Walsh

    Liberal pleas to return to a "normal" defined by bipartisan consensus ignore the long legacy of ideological conflict and the pursuit of division as a political strategy by the conservative movement. 



  • Why Supermarkets Are Powerful Flash Points In Racial Politics

    by Tracey Deutsch and James McElroy

    In addition to selling food, grocery stores have also preserved a social order that treats shoppers of different races differently, dispensing hierarchy along with food — and, in fact, creating it.



  • Neoliberal Hong Kong Is Our Future, Too

    by Macabe Keliher

    While orthodox economists like to point to Hong Kong as an ideal free market, the social consequences have been disastrous. Inequality is rising, wages are declining and working hours increasing, overall economic opportunity is dwindling, and housing is so unaffordable that office workers sleep in McDonalds. Is it any wonder that the streets are now burning?



  • Economic Reforms Might Be The Best Health-Care Reforms

    by Evelynn M. Hammonds and Susan M. Reverby

    Only by understanding and confronting this entangled web of racism and public health can we actually solve a problem that has been centuries in the making.


  • Thinking About Racism Beyond Statues and Symbols

    by Dolores Janiewski

    In his life and his death Floyd experienced the coercive structures that constrain, punish and eventually kill altogether too many Americans. More than Confederate statues, these need to be torn down.



  • Equal Opportunity is Not Enough

    by Elizabeth M. Smith-Pryor

    The myth of America as an equal opportunity society has historically allowed white Americans to hold out equality as a promise redeemable in the future but rarely available in the present.



  • Martin Luther King’s Giant Triplets of Injustice

    by Andrew Bacevich

    Without addressing the fundamental evils of economic inequality and militarism American society will continue to fail to realize the promise of racial equality, as Martin Luther King warned in his 1967 speech at Riverside Church. 


  • The Great Upheaval of 1877 Sheds Light on Today’s Protests

    by Richard Schneirov

    1877 saw a wave of mass protests and strikes by the urban poor of multiple ethnicities, violent repression by the forces of law and order, and a news media that focused on sensational instances of looting and property damage while ignoring the protesters' complaints about inequality during a brutal economic downturn.