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economic history



  • The Necessary Radicalism of Bernie Sanders

    by Jamelle Bouie

    Conflict was the engine of labor reform in the 1930s. And mass strikes and picketing, in particular, pushed the federal government to act.



  • When the American right loved Mexico

    by Mario Del Pero and Vanni Pettinà

    Back when conservatives exalted free markets, our neighbor to the south was a vital ally.



  • Why We Need More Black Women In Economics

    by Keri Leigh Merritt

    Recently a group of brilliant, driven, young Black women formed The Sadie Collective, an organization that “seeks to be an answer to the dismal representation of Black women in the quantitatively demanding fields such as public policy, economics, data analytics, and finance.”



  • The President Didn't Always Have Power Over Trade Deals

    by William Hauk

    Until the 1930s, it was Congress that set the terms of U.S. trade negotiations with other countries and raised and lowered tariffs as it saw fit, while the president did little but sign his name.



  • Grant’s First Tomb

    by Jamelle Bouie

    Ulysses S. Grant, inaugurated as president 150 years ago today, missed a chance to reconstruct the South economically as well as politically.