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human rights


  • The Wagner Group is Just the Latest Example of Privatized War

    by Lawrence Wittner

    Hiring soldiers of fortune to wage war has long been profitable to mercenaries and politically advantageous to rulers. Its modern resurgence with the American Blackwater organization and the Russian Wagner Group show the need for stronger cooperative security to prevent human rights abuse.



  • These Books Tell of Change Happening Slowly, then Suddenly

    Historians Lynn Hunt, Adam Hochschild, Kate Clifford-Larse and Keenaga-Yamahtta Taylor are among the authors whose books dig beneath the surface of famous leaders to describe how social movements built the strength to change laws, institutions and ideas. 


  • A Tale of Two Olympics: Changed China in a Changed World

    by Joe Renouard

    Since the 2008 Beijing games, the People's Republic of China's vastly increased global economic power and the COVID pandemic have changed the core narrative around the current winter games. It remains to be seen whether the Olympics will signal a turn back to openness or the intransigence of a confident world power. 



  • Will the Diplomatic Boycott of the Olympics Have any Effect on China?

    by Meghan Herwig

    After Tiananmen Square, it became clear that American foreign policy was limited by other Asian nation's growing dependence on China. Today, as regional relations shift, will a more effective human rights advocacy be possible? 



  • The US Has Long Exploited the Legally Ambiguous Status of Guantanamo Bay

    by Jana Lipman

    The use of the naval base at Guantanamo bay for the detention of both suspected terrorists and refugees and migrants reflects the place's status as outside both Cuban and U.S. law. Since the end of the Spanish-American war, Cuban workers have understood the threat of abuse this status enables. 



  • Russia Bans Human Rights Group Memorial

    "Russia’s supreme court 'liquidated' Memorial, the country’s most vital post-Soviet civic institution, dedicated to the memory of Stalinist repression and the defence of human rights."



  • Fishing, Not Catching, in the History of the Law

    by John Fabian Witt

    John Fabian Witt writes about a critical exchange over Samuel Moyn's book on humanitarian war, and questions Moyn's conception of the relationship between a scholar's politics and their methodology. 



  • Dosing Arkansas Prisoners with Ivermectin Just Latest Incident of Medical Abuse

    by Lydia Crafts

    "News that an Arkansas prison doctor deceived inmates to take Ivermectin as a COVID preventative shows that nonconsensual research and the experimental use of drugs on vulnerable people remain common — despite evidence of its danger and laws designed to prevent it."



  • Honoring Attica After Half a Century

    by Heather Ann Thompson

    Activists both inside and outside of prisons in the 1960s and 1970s confronted the violence of the state. Accountability for law enforcement is still an unrealized legacy of the 1971 Attica rebellion.