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reproductive rights



  • For Deliverance: A Letter on Roe

    by Riley Clare Valentine

    A Catholic scholar and activist concludes "it is an act of love, of caritas, to reject the unjust undoing of Roe and to continue to help our neighbors who need access to abortions."



  • Antiabortion Movement Gunning for Contraceptive Rights, Too

    by Anya Jabour

    A century ago, sex researcher Katharine Bement Davis was silenced because she fought to redefine women's sexuality and contraceptive use as normal and fight for its decriminalization. The right today wants to undo her legacy through the courts.



  • The Religious History of Caesarean Surgery and the Abortion Debate

    by Elizabeth O'Brien

    In the 18th century, priests in Spanish colonies in the Americas were required to perform Caesaran operations on pregnant women whose own lives were beyond saving in order to baptize their fetuses, helping to develop the Catholic doctrine that the unborn already had souls. 



  • How Black Feminists Defined Abortion Rights

    by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

    Arguments in the Dobbs case have privileged the concerns of affluent, professional women – hardly the Mississippians whose lives will be affected by the state's draconian abortion bans. The abortion rights movement needs to return to its roots in racial and economic justice. 



  • Abortion isn't a "Choice" without Racial Justice

    by Sara Matthiesen

    The recent failure of the broad social spending initiatives of Build Back Better and the impending judicial overthrow of Roe are connected, and signal the need for a movement for reproductive freedom that goes beyond "choice" to address systemic inequalities. 



  • What RBG Got Wrong about the Abortion Debate and the Courts

    by Felicia Kornbluh

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg stated that the Roe v. Wade decision inflamed abortion politics by preventing the states from legislating on the issue. The history of abortion legislation doesn't suggest that it would have, or will ever, create consensus. 



  • What Will it Look Like if Abortion Becomes a Crime Again?

    Since the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, America's law enforcement and mass incarceration systems have grown, and women are already today the fastest-growing imprisoned demographic. What happens if the widespread practice of abortion is criminalized? 



  • AHA, OAH File SCOTUS Amicus Brief in Mississippi Abortion Ban Case

    This brief, based on decades of study and research by professional historians, aims to provide an accurate historical perspective as the Court considers the state of Mississippi’s challenge to a woman’s right to abortion, a right that was affirmed by the Court in Roe v. Wade.



  • The Lies of TV's Abortion Storylines

    by Tanya Melendez

    "Looking back on how abortion came into our living rooms starting in the 1960s and persisted into our audience-fragmented streaming era can teach us how these stories taught, shaped, and contributed to today’s public discourse about abortion."



  • Reframing Abortion as a Public Good

    by Judith Levine

    "States have a compelling interest—a profound obligation—to defend the right to abortion. Abortion is a public good. Why haven’t we linked abortion to the commonweal?"



  • Peering Into Windows and Wombs: Reflections on SB 8

    by Gillian Frank

    "Even as abortion opponents loudly proclaim they are acting by divine mandate, people of faith like Dr. Curtis Boyd remain on the frontlines of this battle for reproductive healthcare."



  • The Way it Was

    "That year in the 1960s, several thousand American women were treated in emergency rooms for botched abortions, and there were at least 200 known deaths.Comparing my story with others from the pre-Roe era, what impresses me is how close I veered to mortal danger."



  • Edsall: Abortion Has Always Been Part of Broader Politics

    Thomas Edsall draws on the work of historians Katherine Stewart, Randall Balmer, Jefferson Cowie and Darren Dochuk, plus other scholars, to argue that the "right to life" movement grew from the movement of resistance to school integration and today is sustained by politics of masculinity.