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television


  • How an American TV Mini-Series Helped the Germans Acknowledge the Holocaust

    by Robert Brent Toplin

    An American television minseries overcame initial skepticism by German authorities to rouse public conscience about the Holocaust and the complicity of ordinary Germans with persecution and genocide. Americans hesitant toward "political" popular culture should consider its contributions to truth and reconciliation.



  • Settler Fantasies, Televised

    by Hannah Manshell

    The genre of house hunting and home improvement shows involve contestants claiming the prerogatives of owning property, which has historically been allotted to white people at the expense of the indigenous in several societies. 



  • There’s Nothing Good About Phyllis Schlafly

    by Eileen Jones

    "Mrs. America", the new miniseries about Phyllis Schlafly, doesn’t want us to come away with a harsh view of its subject. But we should: Schlafly’s right-wing views were consistently monstrous, doing untold damage to the country.



  • How We Got to Sesame Street

    by Jill Lepore

    The beloved children's program grew from the need to use the overabundance of televisions to fix the dearth of preschools in 1960s America. Jill Lepore assesses how the show has changed along with society.



  • 'Mrs. America' Makes the Case for Messy History

    In allowing various perspectives to shine through, "Mrs. America" takes a piece of the past that, through the work of time, has been smoothed of its rough edges and grants it complexity.