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anthropology



  • Harvard Holds Remains of 7,000 Native and Enslaved Persons

    by Gillian Brockell

    A university task force convened last year to investigate the provenance of human remains in Harvard's museums and collections condemned the leak of the report while defending their committee's work toward returning remains to appropriate tribal authorities and memorializing the deceased. 



  • The Antivax Right is Bringing Human Sacrifice to America

    Past debates about closing schools and businesses to control the pandemic at least could claim to be about balancing costs and benefits. The campaign to refuse vaccination will kill people for no purpose whatsoever.



  • Can Skeletons Have Racial Identity?

    Forensic anthropologists have largely stuck with techniques for assigning geographic ancestry to skeletal remains. Recently, the origins of those techniques in last century's scientific racism have prompted some in the discipline to call for stopping the practice.



  • What Should Museums Do With the Bones of the Enslaved?

    The Smithsonian is considering how to deal with its natural history collection of human remains, including those of enslaved people. Secretary Lonnie Bunch III suggests that the museum must be guided by the imperative "to honor and remember."



  • Paleo Con

    by Daniel Immerwahr

    Why do the lifestyles of paleolithic hunter-gatherers repeatedly pop up as foils for western capitalist modernity? 



  • The Thanksgiving Myth Gets a Deeper Look This Year

    “There was an event that happened in 1621,” Wampanoag historian Linda Coombs said. “But the whole story about what occurred on that first Thanksgiving was a myth created to make white people feel comfortable.” Native activists hope to disrupt the stories of Thanksgiving by questioning public history and by recovering indigenous food practices.


  • What's in an Un-Naming? Berkeley's Kroeber Hall

    by Tony Platt

    Alfred Kroeber built the University of California's anthropology department into a world leader literally with the bones of the Native peoples of California. It's time to honor them. 


  • Walkability Is at the Heart of Human Societies

    by Antonia Malchik

    We’ve forgotten about shared space, about public roads, and the fact that tens of thousands of years of human history demonstrates a profound need for the daily, in-person interactions walkability provides.