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Protest


  • The View from the New York City Hiroshima Peace Vigil

    by Michael McQuillan

    The march featured the testimony of antinuclear activists and rekindled a demand for New York's city council to divest the city budget from contractors who make nuclear weapons, but too much of the public seems willing to ignore the nuclear threat.



  • History Was Never Subject to Democratic Control

    by Helen Lewis

    Neither the local economic elite who put up Edward Colston's statue in Bristol, England nor the activists who tore it down operated with a public mandate. What are the prospects for democratic and consensual public history? 



  • Did Last Summer's BLM Protests Change Anything?

    by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

    A commission convened by the Mayor of Philadelphia exemplifies the American preference for symbolism over substance in recently proclaimed "racial reckonings." 



  • Answering the Armies of the Cheated (But No Questions about War Please!)

    by Andrew Bacevich

    Americans wondering why their nation is failing to meet their basic needs since supposedly winning the Cold War need to reckon with its successor ideology, the idea of America as the Indispensable Nation, and the costs of intervention it has inspired. 



  • It's Impossible to Separate Politics and the Olympics

    by Michelle Sikes

    The Supreme Council for Sport in Africa was a collaboration of 32 nations to pressure international sporting authorities to seek to bar the white supremacist regimes of South Africa and Rhodesia from major competition, most notably through a boycott of the 1976 Montreal games. 



  • The IOC May Not Like it, but the Games have Always Been a Forum for Protest

    by Harry Blutstein

    "Baron Pierre de Coubertin, believed that Olympiads were a way to communicate “love for concord and a respect for life.” So it was not surprising that activist athletes saw the Olympics as a legitimate forum to promote those values whenever they saw them violated."



  • Black Lives Matter Misses the Point About Cuba

    by Jorge Felipe Gonzalez

    American activists who recognize the antiracist achievements of the revolutionary Cuban government miss the ways that that government's authoritarianism and more recent economic policies disproportionately harm Afro-Cuban people. 



  • Daphne Brooks on Truth-Telling Music

    African American Studies scholar Daphne Brooks tells the back stories of Black women in music and the cultural impact of their songs. 



  • Learn Lessons about Movement Building from Radical Black Women

    by Keisha N. Blain, Premilla Nadasen and Robyn C. Spencer

    Barbara Ransby facilitates a roundtable collaborative essay about the role of women in building radical movements for justice in Black communities encompassing social welfare, economic security, police accountability, women's liberation and more. 



  • Cubans Took to the Streets in 1994, Too

    by Rozzmery Palenzuela Vicente

    Since the Clinton administration, decreased willingness by the US to accept Cuban migrants as political refugees has eliminated a significant safety valve against dissent on the island – encouraging Cuban dissidents to leave. This may make current protests more enduring and possibly more effective. 



  • Black Power and Anti-Carceral State Infrastructure

    by Joshua L. Crutchfield

    Mutual aid groups that formed in response to the COVID pandemic echo the ways that participants in the Black Freedom movement sought to create alternative instititutions for the benefit of communities and individuals that did not reinforce the power of the police.