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Richard Striner


  • Originally published 06/07/2013

    Galambos, Striner, and van Ee recommend Ike quotes for memorial

    WASHINGTON — Three historians are recommending the use of passages from key speeches by President Dwight D. Eisenhower — including his message to troops during the D-Day invasion — to help represent the 34th president in a planned memorial in the nation’s capital.On Wednesday night, the Eisenhower Memorial Commission hosted a public forum on which of Ike’s words should be included in the memorial planned for a site near the National Mall. The design of the planned memorial has been hotly debated.Professor Louis Galambos of Johns Hopkins University, Professor Richard Striner of Washington College in Maryland and former Library of Congress historian Daun van Ee studied Eisenhower’s speeches to recommend six for consideration. Two are from Eisenhower’s tenure as World War II general and four come from his presidency....

  • Originally published 03/14/2013

    Can American Conservatism Be Salvaged?

    Credit: DonkeyHotey.The greatest threat to the United States today is the Republican Party. The once-magnificent organization of Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, and Dwight D. Eisenhower has degenerated into a coalition of religious fanatics, gun lunatics, shills for the rich, and libertarian simpletons who hover at the brink of anarchism and would probably like nothing better than to see the United States unable to play the role of a superpower any longer.

  • Originally published 01/31/2013

    Richard Striner: 'Hurrah for Old Abe'

    Richard Striner, a history professor at Washington College, is the author of “Lincoln and Race.”Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863, but the immediate reactions for and against it reverberated loudly throughout the following month.Almost all abolitionists and radical Republicans, even those who had condemned Lincoln’s methods as being too cautious, were thrilled. William Lloyd Garrison, the venerable abolitionist, called the occasion “a great historic event, sublime in its magnitude and beneficent in its far-reaching consequences.” The radical Republican Benjamin Wade proclaimed, “Now, hurrah for Old Abe and the proclamation!”Black Americans were naturally likewise jubilant. The minister Henry Highland Garnet called Lincoln “the man of our choice and hope” and said that the proclamation was “one of the greatest acts in all history.” Frederick Douglass said much the same thing: the proclamation was “the greatest event in our nation’s history.”

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