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memorials



  • My Local Confederate Monument

    by Casey Cep

    The author examines the history and politics of the last remaining Confederate monument on public lands, other than battlefields and cemeteries, in the state of Maryland. 



  • Voltaire Spread Darkness, Not Enlightenment. France Should Stop Worshipping Him.

    by Nabila Ramdani

    Nabila Ramdani argues that the French Enlightenment thinker's abstract defenses of free speech and inquiry should not overshadow the concrete content of what he said and wrote, which included historically influential racist and antisemitic bigotry cloaked in the language of reason and science.



  • DC Releases Long List of Facilities to Be Renamed, Relocated, or Contextualized

    A commission convened by DC Mayor Muriel Bowser recommends that the District rename many schools and city facilities that honor historical figures associated with slavery and racism, and asks the city government to pressure the federal government to do the same with federal properties in the district. 


  • Gettysburg’s First Confederate Monument

    by David K. Graham

    The dedication in 1886 of a monument to the Maryland 2nd Confederate Regiment at Gettysburg launched the movement by southern partisans to lay claim to the site of the Union victory as a monument to national reconciliation. The Grand Army of the Republic organization wasn't buying it then, and we shouldn't today.



  • Why the Fight Over Statues Will Never End (video)

    Art historian and "art crime" expert Erin Thompson offers insight into the history of iconoclasm and why social change makes arguments about statues and public memorials inevitable.



  • Rethinking Who and What Get Memorialized

    The notion that history can be rewritten is a powerful one. It starts by taking the pen from the authors we’ve always had — and giving it to someone else.



  • Clemson Discovers Graves of Dozens of People Enslaved by John C. Calhoun

    “My research shows that Black lives hardly mattered at all at Clemson until after desegregation, and the discovery we made in this burial ground tells me that Black deaths mattered even less,” Dr. Rhondda Thomas said Monday. “The thing that I found was that Black labor mattered the most on this land where Clemson was built.”