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memorials



  • Why I Vandalized Ole Miss's Confederate Statue

    Zach Borenstein explains why he painted "Spiritual Genocide" on the base of a campus Confederate memorial, and why he wishes he had talked with local activists first. 



  • Hundreds of Errors in Korean War Memorial Wall

    If the Korean conflict is often called a "forgotten war," the wall of remembrance added to the Korean War Veterans' Memorial doesn't meet the challenge of remembering the fallen. 



  • The Monument Controversy We Aren't Discussing

    by Cynthia C. Prescott

    Outside of the former Confederacy, efforts to replace "Pioneer Mother" statues with depictions of Native American women have sparked a backlash including outright theft.



  • An Exclusive Look at the New WWI Memorial

    Sculptor Sabin Howard's ambitious design for the memorial relied on the modern power of digital photography to capture motion and the old-school forming of clay to freeze it in time. 



  • Post Editors: Statue or No, Teddy Roosevelt's Complex Legacy is Still with Us

    It's appropriate for Theodore Roosevelt's statue to be removed from its position as a figurehead for the Museum of Natural History, but just as appropriate for the statue to be housed in the new Roosevelt Presidential Library where TR's complicated legacy can be more fully addressed, say the Post's editorial board members.



  • Confederate Groups are Keeping the Lost Cause Myth on Life Support

    by Erin L. Thompson

    "Confederate heritage" groups have used their financial resources to bring lawsuits before sympathetic judges to thwart the public's desire to remove monuments to the white supremacist pro-slavery government in public spaces. 



  • Alabama's Capitol is a Crime Scene, with a 120 Year Coverup

    The Alabama Capitol in Montgomery was the first seat of the Confederate government and the place where white Democrats ratified a Jim Crow constitution in 1901. You'd learn little of this by touring the museum-like building. 



  • Richmond's Lee Statue, other Confederate Memorials Could go to Black History Museum

    Marland Buckner, interim executive director of the Black History Museum, said in the release that his institution “takes very seriously the responsibility to manage these objects in ways that ensure their origins and purpose are never forgotten: that is the glorification of those who led the fight to enslave African Americans and destroy the Union.”



  • Blair Mountain, West Virginia Still Shows the Grip of the Coal Industry

    “It was kind of weird growing up, knowing that there was a war fought here and nobody knew about it, and there’s no monuments to it,” Professor Chuck Keeney said. Others believe the story of the mine wars has been suppressed because it challenges the image of big coal as a benevolent force in the state.