Blogs > HNN > IS BRIBERY BEHIND THE MEDIA COVERAGE OF ARAB AFFAIRS?

Jan 19, 2005 4:51 pm


IS BRIBERY BEHIND THE MEDIA COVERAGE OF ARAB AFFAIRS?



Are reporters bribed? -

How else can one explain the recent nutty coverage of the Hammas challenge to Abbas?

The Scotsman:"Sharon's phone call to Abbas sparks new wave of violence" - In other words, Sharon is to blame. If only he did not congratulate Abbas . . .

On the day an Israeli teen ager who saved her brother by throwing herself on him, the NYT wants its readers to sympathize with the attackers. It posts a picture showing a mother and children crying. The caption reads:"Caption:"The family of Nidal Sadek, a Palestinian militant who was killed Monday by Israeli troops in a raid in the Gaza Strip." It was taken by Mohammed Salem forReuters.

Next, we will have an interview with Bin Laden's children discussing how much they miss their father.

Is it possible, that the reason their is so little coverage of Arab politics is not only that"[Most reporters] are lazy. And Israel is a safe target. The access is easier there than in many Arab countries. But this reporting doesn't help Palestinians know which mayoral candidate to vote for... The militants are ready with a video of masked men and a person available for comment a half-hour after the story breaks."(01/02/2005) Nabil Khatib, Chief of Correspondents, Al Arabiya TV? Is it possible that bribery works not only with the Arab press but also with the Western one? Just note, the little attention the following item got in the American press:"Officials running the election campaign of the coalition headed by Iraq's interim prime minister, Iyad Allawi, last night made light of the revelation that journalists attending its press conferences had been given envelopes containing a $100 note, calling the gift"just hospitality". About 20 envelopes were handed to members of the local and international press after one recent campaign meeting. Some journalists declined the present but others accepted. News of the largesse, common practice during Saddam Hussein's rule and in neighboring Arab countries, had provoked speculation that Iraq was returning to the habits and customs of the Ba'athist regime. . . . For a young Iraqi journalist $100, or £53, represents more than two weeks' pay." Investigation, please! Let's see how much attention the admission of the Palestinian producer: False film funded by PA about the so called"Jenin Massacce" gets.




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