Blogs > HNN > June 30-September 11, 1862: Confederate Eugenia Phillips is sentenced to Ship Island by "the Beast" General Butler

Aug 20, 2008 10:57 pm


June 30-September 11, 1862: Confederate Eugenia Phillips is sentenced to Ship Island by "the Beast" General Butler



On this day in history...June 30, 1862 to September 11, 1862, Eugenia Levy Phillips, an ardent Confederate was arrested and sentenced to time on Ship Island, Mississippi because she laughed during a Union soldier's funeral procession in New Orleans.

During the Civil War, women in the South contributed on many levels to the cause through volunteer work, as war supply collectors, seamstresses and nurses, but the far more committed chose to rebel against the Union officials. Many Southern women took advantage of the new politicizing position the war granted women by demonstrating their loyalty to the South through fiercer methods, often through illegal means including, smuggling, espionage, and belligerency. Phoebe Pember summed up Southern women's devotion best when she wrote,"women of the South had been openly and violently rebellious from the moment they thought their states' rights touched. They incited the men to struggle in support of their views, and whether right or wrong, sustained them nobly to the end. They were the first to rebel - and the last to succumb." (Rosen, 44)

The South's small Jewish population adamantly sided with their Southern neighbors and so did their women. The majority of these Jewish women were not recent immigrants, but American born and shared the lifestyle and values of their Christian counterparts. As Hasia Diner and Beryl Lieff Benderly write,"Rosana [Osterman], the Levy sisters, and the Natchez M[a]yer daughters were not, of course, recent immigrants but rather the American-born descendants of earlier migrant generations. But they, like Jews throughout the country, both newly arrived and long established, saw themselves as wholehearted Americans and fashioned their lives and identities in response to an American reality quite unlike anything Jews had ever experienced elsewhere." (Diner and Benderly, 106) These women were Jewish southern belles and lived their lives accordingly.

These Southern Jewish women were integrated in Southern society, and were attached to a lifestyle they had become accustomed to, and as the war demonstrated Southerners and the Confederacy were more tolerant of Jews than the Union army that ravaged the South, Southern Jews recognized this and devotedly aligned themselves with their beloved South at all costs. As the doyen of American Jewish history Jacob Rader Marcus writes,"The Southern Jewesses were fanatically, almost hysterically, passionate in their sympathies for their new regime. Were they trying to prove that they were more ardent than their neighbors? Why?" (Marcus, 31)

The Levys were a prominent Southern Jewish family. When the Civil War broke-out they became loyal supporters of the Confederate cause. Two of the sisters, Eugenia Levy Phillips and her younger sister Phoebe Yates Levy Pember, would be remembered in history as ardent Confederates, expressing their devotion at opposite extremes. Phoebe Pember nursed the wounded Confederates. She was one of the South's most remembered female hospital matrons and a nurse in the largest military hospital in the Confederacy during the Civil War. She was the chief matron at Hospital Number Two at Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, Virginia, from 1862 to 1865. Pember's older sister Eugenia, however, was such an ardent Confederate that her devotion to the cause showed no boundaries, and she is remembered for supposedly serving as a Confederate spy and for her hostility to one of the Union's fiercest generals, Benjamin Butler, who was known for his hatred of the Confederacy as much as his anti-Semitic attitudes.

Eugenia Levy Phillips, born in Charleston in 1819, was the daughter of Jacob Clavius Levy, a merchant, and Fanny Yates Levy, an actress. She married U.S. Congressman Philip Phillips of Mobile, Alabama when she was 16, and went on to have nine children. Phillips was a leading figure in Alabama politics from the 1830s to the 1850s when he was elected to the United States Congress in 1852. After one term in Congress, he established a law practice in Washington, D.C. Eugenia and her husband differed greatly in their political beliefs; Phillips was a Unionist, while Eugenia was probably one of the fiercest secessionists in the District of Columbia. Eugenia also socialized with other secessionists and women suspected of spying on the Union for the Confederacy, particularly Rose O'Neal Greenhow, well-known Confederate spy. Eugenia Phillips writing in her journal claimed,"American women knew nothing of war, believed less in the cruelties and fearful vindictiveness of the Federal governm[en]t. Thus the Southern women gave free expression to the feelings which habit had made but second nature, and spoke of their hatred and determination to sustain their rights by encouraging in their husbands, sons, and fathers every resistance to tyranny exhibited by the Republicans." (Journal of Mrs. Eugenia Levy Phillips, 1861-1862)

Eugenia's associations and excessive antagonism toward the Union made her a target for government surveillance. On August 24, 1861, Federal officers came into Eugenia and Phillip Phillips' home arresting both of them. Phillip remained under house arrest for a week, but Eugenia and two of their daughters, Fanny and Caroline as well as Eugenia's sister, Martha Levy, where taken to Rose Greenhow's house to be imprisoned. The Union had arrested Greenhow the previous day for relaying plans for the first Manassas Campaign to Confederate General McDowell. There all five women remained imprisoned in two rooms in Greenhow's attic with hardly any amenities. Eugenia Phillips described it in her journal,"The stove (broken) served us for table and washstand, while a punch bowl grew into a washbasin. Two filthy straw mattresses kept us warm, and Yankee soldiers were placed at our bedroom door to prevent our escape." (Journal of Mrs. Eugenia Levy Phillips, 1861-1862)

Despite the fact that Union officers had no evidence against her and her family, they remained imprisoned, though Phillip Phillips was allowed to visit and bring food baskets, albeit under strict Union supervision. Eugenia believed her loyalty to her country should not be considered a crime to imprison her for, writing in her memoir,"Again I ask what is my crime? If an ardent attachment to the land of my birth and expression of deepest sympathy with relatives and friends in the South constitute treason than I am indeed a traitor. If hostility towards black Republicanism, its sentiment and policy-it is a crime-and I am self-condemned...!" (Rosen, 288) Southern women were outraged at the North's treatment of women with no reason, especially the imprisonment of Eugenia's two daughters. Phillips had to use his influence with Edward Stanton, Senator Reverdy Johnson from Maryland, and Supreme Court Justice James M. Wayne, the former mayor of Savannah, to secure his family's release. However, the Union exiled the Phillips family from the nation's capital, forcing them to relocate to the Southern states. The whole family was also required to take an oath as a condition of their parole to"not to take illegal actions against the Union."

It would not very long for Eugenia to again to breech the agreement. After leaving Washington the couple first traveled to Norfolk, Virginia and then on to Richmond through Savannah, eventually settling in New Orleans in the closing weeks of 1861. Although conditions were unfavorable for Phillips's law practice, the family settled there because it appeared to be safe from Union army invasion. By April however, the Union army was closing in on the Mississippi River. News Orleans surrendered on April 29, 1862.

By May 1, 1862, Major General Benjamin F. Butler of Massachusetts took over command of the city. Butler tried to control the city with an iron fist. The historian Bertram Wallace Korn describes Butler as a" conniving careerist and political opportunist of major proportions, who was given the title of 'Beast' by the Confederacy for his severity during the early military occupation of New Orleans." (Korn, 164) While historian Robert Rosen writes" 'Beast' Butler was the worst, the Union Army had to offer. He was nicknamed spoons for thiefery of spoons and silverware imputed to him and his soldiers." (Rosen, 290)

In addition to this reputation as a beast, Butler was also a known anti-Semite, who throughout the war openly expressed his hatred for Jews, many of whom had settled in the South. Korn transcribes Butler's sentiments toward Jews,"They were a tightly-knit and highly-organized nation who set themselves apart and defended themselves against others even when one of their group was wrong. They were all 'traders, merchants, and bankers.' He said that the only Jews he ever knew had"been principally engaged in the occupations [i.e. smuggling] which caused the capture which has occasioned this correspondence." They were supporting the Confederacy with whole heart - 'two of them certainly are in the Confederate Cabinet.'" (Korn, 164)

When General Butler occupied New Orleans in May 1862, the Southern population treated the Yankees with such contempt that they refused to comply with Federal orders. Southerners formed mobs to attack Union soldiers; they refused to serve Yankees in their businesses; priests refused to pray for the president of the United States, and one man was even sentenced to be hung for burning the Union flag. Despite the harsh punishments the Yankee soldiers issued to New Orleans natives, the women believed these rules did not apply to them and that they were exempt from all harsh treatments because of their gender. Many of New Orleans' women expressed extreme belligerency toward Union officials.

The majority of the women who acted in this manner were upper class. As historian Drew Gilpin Faust writes, Butler"recognized that the perpetrators were generally young, often 'pretty and interesting,' and frequently socially prominent, the kind of individuals who would attract both attention and sympathy if harsh measures turned them into martyrs." (Faust, 209) At the same time, however, Butler knew he had to control their actions, for as he recalled in his memoir,"a city could hardly be said to be under good government where such things were permitted." (Butler, 417) On May 15 in retaliation to the women's disrespectful behavior Butler issued his infamous General Order No. 28, known as the"Women order":

General Order No. 28. As the officers and soldiers of the United States have been subject to repeated insults from the women (calling themselves ladies) of New Orleans . . . it is ordered that hereafter when any female shall, by word, gesture, or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to be treated as a woman of the town plying her avocation. (Butler, 421, 418; Faust, 210).

The order put Eugenia Phillips in danger of yet again being imprisoned because of her fierce loyalty to the Confederacy, and her utter disregard and respect for the Union. Phillips was vulnerable to Butler's wrath because she was both Jewish and a member of the city's Confederate aristocracy. In an attempt to avoid Butler's anger Eugenia and the Phillips family remained for the most part at home. However, Eugenia still managed to attract Butler's fury. The Phillips's house was situated next to city hall. The day of Union Officer Lieutenant DeKay's funeral procession passed by the street, Butler caught Eugenia blurting out in laughter and cheering on the terrace of her home. As Benjamin Butler biographer Hans L. Trefousse writes,"High spirited and intensely loyal to the Confederacy, she had been in trouble before when she was apprehended for espionage in Washington. This time, not espionage but merriment was to prove her undoing." (Trefousse, 118)

Eugenia denied she had laughed at the funeral procession. There have been two accounts explaining why she was laughing. First Eugenia's daughter Caroline claims it was because Eugenia heard of a Confederate victory and was in a celebratory mood, while other accounts including Eugenia's own excuse, claim she was laughing at the antics of her younger children at a party. At first when Butler called her to the Customs House, as Rosen writes,"Eugenia, active in raising money for the widow of a man executed by Butler for having hauled down the flag from the federal mint, believed she was being prosecuted for her pro-Southern beliefs." (Rosen, 291) At the Customs House Butler screamed at Eugenia,"You are seen laughing and mocking at the remains of a Federal officer. I do not call you a common woman of the town, but an uncommonly vulgar one, and I sentence you to Ship Island for the War." Eugenia's reply further angered Butler as she wrote,"Again my insolence aroused this son of liberty, particularly as in reply to his accusation I had said: 'I was in good spirits the day of the funeral.'" (Journal of Mrs. Eugenia Levy Phillips, 1861-1862)

Eugenia's response and her refusal to plead and beg for freedom led to her harsh punishment rather than her original crime. As she explained in her journal,"I noted that he took a mighty long time to write my sentence, and I suspected that he hoped by delay I would throw myself on his mercy, or beg his pardon, or promise never to do so again. Nothing of this kind ever crossed my brain, and, full of holy indignation and determination to meet with silent contempt this outrageous insult, I quietly folded my arms and looked on him while he wrote. Not a word of appeal or explanation broke the ominous silence. My accuser had made the charge and sentenced me without judge or jury." (Journal of Mrs. Eugenia Levy Phillips, 1861-1862)

Butler wrote in Special Order No. 150 delineating Eugenia Phillips' sentence:"...having been once imprisoned for her traitorous proclivities and acts at Washington, and released by the clemency of the Government, and having been found training her children to spit on officers of the United States, for which act of one of those children both her husband and herself apologized and were again forgiven, [she] is now found on the balcony of her house during the passage of the funeral procession of Lieut. DeKay, laughing and mocking at his remains, and upon being inquired of by the Commanding General if this fact were so, contemptuously replies,"I was in good spirits that day." (Korn, 164; Special Order No. 150)

Butler ordered Eugenia to remain on Ship Island, a known yellow fever quarantine station situated off the coast of Mississippi. The island was infested with mosquitoes. In the summer the heat could be fatal while hygiene and proper food was hard to come by. Butler allowed Eugenia to have one servant to accompany and attend to her during her imprisonment, and she took her loyal servant Phebe with her. She was also not allowed to communicate with anyone but Butler and her maid; any letters she wrote her family were reviewed by Union guards, and only after she was freed did her family truly learn about her living conditions on the island.

On June 30, 1862 Eugenia commenced her imprisonment, first living in a former railroad boxcar and then in an abandoned post office building. Butler allowed Mr. Phillips to send Eugenia some food, mostly beans and spoiled beef. The harsh conditions took a heavy toll on Eugenia Phillips; the deprivation of food nearly destroyed her health, and Eugenia suffered from brain fever, which was considered nervous exhaustion. Her continued pride and loyalty to the Confederacy was the main reason Butler did not release Eugenia earlier. As she wrote in her journal,"The 'great' Gen. Butler sent once a week to inquire after my health. He, no doubt, hoped I would at last cringe and beg. Thank God, who gave me strength and patience to keep me from this black stain." (Journal of Mrs. Eugenia Levy Phillips, 1861-1862)

September 11, 1862, after nearly three months on Ship Island, Butler finally released Eugenia. When she arrived home and her husband opened the door, she believed he was seeing a ghost as believed as he was not certain she was still alive by that point. Publicly while she was imprisoned her whereabouts were vague. (Journal of Mrs. Eugenia Levy Phillips, 1861-1862)

Throughout her time on the island, Eugenia was able to send out a few letters to her family, which described the"gruesome" and inhumane conditions she was forced to live in; these letters according to George Rable"made her imprisonment a cause célèbre." Eugenia's imprisonment caused an uproar from Southerners. The press throughout the country carried the story. Most people believed the sentence was too harsh for the crime. Korn explains,"The war which Butler waged upon this Jewess and other Southern women made him the Confederacy's 'Public Enemy Number One,' with a price upon his head." (Korn, 164) The citizens of New Orleans visited the Phillips family home as a sign of support.

The Jewish community and other Southern women abhorred the treatment that Eugenia was receiving at the hands of Butler. Mary Chesnut, a Christian friend of Eugenia Phillips, wrote in A Diary from Dixie,"Mrs. Phillips, another beautiful and clever Jewess, has been put in prison again by 'Beast' Butler for laughing as a Yankee funeral procession went by." (Chesnut, 266) There was even talk of Southerners planning to rescue Eugenia. According to Trefousse,"It was a sentence as harsh as it was sensational. Southerners talked of rescuing the lady, but they lacked the necessary ships and found it impossible to carry out their chivalrous plan. Butler pardoned her in September, two and a half months after her arrest, but this action did not dispel the popular belief that he was a cruel tyrant." (Trefousse, 118)

Butler regretted that Eugenia's imprisonment had the opposite effect than he intended. He wanted to make Eugenia's treasonous behavior toward the Union an example of what happened to women who display such behavior. Instead, as Rable writes, Butler turned"an irksome rebel into a martyr," which was the main reason he chose to release her from Ship Island early. Eugenia Phillips, according to Rable,"had shown considerable public relations acumen, and her prison journal reveals an ironic sense of humor, especially in her wry proposal to use a steam device to pump moisture into the rock-hard bread. Though not exactly besting Butler, she had played the wily Massachusetts politician to a draw." (Clinton, 142) Despite the cruel punishment that awaited her, Eugenia remained loyal to the Confederacy. As William Garett noted,"her proud Southern spirit never quailed and she remained firm to the last in the opinions she had expressed." (Rosen, 293)

Eugenia Levy Phillips's devotion to the Confederacy appeared"unquestionable," as Lauren Winner describes. Although Eugenia was a practicing Jew, she saw herself especially during the war as primarily a Southerner who would support her" country" at all costs, which she did. As Winner explains, Phillips"was so unswerving in her devotion to the Confederate cause that the Union suspected her of being a spy." (Clinton, 195) Eugenia Phillips and her sister Phoebe Pember have been the Southern Jewish women most remembered by historians, and their devotion has been elevated beyond their religion, which was the hope of most of the Southern Jewish women that volunteered in support of the cause.

Sources and Further Reading

Benjamin F. Butler, Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin F. Butler, (Thayer, 1892).

Mary Boykin Miller Chestnut, Ben Williams Ames, ed., A Diary from Dixie, (Harvard University Press, 1980).

Catherine Clinton, Nina Silber, eds., Divided Houses: Gender and the Civil War, (Oxford University Press, 1992).

Drew Gilpin Faust, Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War, (University of North Carolina Press, 1996).

Bertram Wallace Korn, American Jewry and the Civil War, (Jewish Publication Society, 1951).

Jacob R. Marcus, The American Jewish Woman: A Documentary History, (Ktav Pub. House; American Jewish Archives, 1981).

Eugenia Phillips, Journal of Mrs. Eugenia Levy Phillips, 1861-1862.

Samuel Proctor, et al., eds., Jews of the South: Selected Essays from the Southern Jewish Historical Society, (Mercer University Press, 1984).

Robert Rosen, The Jewish Confederates, (University of South Carolina Press, 2000).

Special Order No. 150, Headquarters Department of the Gulf, June 30, 1862.

Hans L. Trefousse, Ben Butler: The South Called Him Beast!, (Twayne Publishers, 1957).



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Josef Nix - 3/14/2009

Thank you for your interest in the story of one of my and my family's heroines. Please allow me the honor of responding below.


"I think Charleston South Carolina was one of the first cities in North America to grant all the rights and privledges of citizenship."


It was not just the first city, but the first place in the modern world to do so.


"The city's 1669 charter drawn up by the English philosopher John Locke er granted liberty of conscience to all settlers, expressly mentioning "Jews, heathens, and dissenters."

The document, the Carolina Charter, granted "equal rights of citizenship to Jews, Heathens and Dissenters." My own family traces its roots in one line to the Valentin family, among the first to be granted this freedom.

I like to twit those from the North who would demean the South that this was at the time New England was dunking "witches."

"Two little known facts about Charleston’s Jewish community are
that Jewish merchants moving to Charleston from the French Caribbean introduced a French variation of freemasonry into North America that later evolved into what is known as the Scottish Rite, and that they produced at least one confederate general officer (Gen. E. W. Moise) , who later became the adjutant-general of the state of South Carolina

The Charleston Jewish community and its descendents have produced a roster of "firsts" in America of stellar proportions. The first Jew to fall in defense of his country was Francis Salvador, the Paul Revere of the South. Salvador was also the first Jew to serve in a national legislative body, representing South Carolina in the Continental Congress. The Charleston traditions, the standard for the ante-bellum South, insured that a list of "Jewish firsts" in the United States reads as a Southern list.

The Southern Jewish Historical Society is doing some great work in bringing to light the story of this "portion of the people," long overlooked and a treasure trove of stories to tell.

I count myself to be blessed to have been born among a people who not only "tolerate" Jews but have, throughout their history, considered the Jewish heritage so respected and admired as to identify themselves and their culture fundamentally with its message to humanity.

My outlander friends and associates find it hard to understand that I do not know where my Southerness begins and my Jewishness ends or vice-versa. The two are inseperable and this is a world view I share with my fellow Southerners of whatever background.



Josef Nix - 3/14/2009

Thank you for your interest in my heroine! I have posted my comments on the article. Really a very, very good overview on tbe part of the author and, as a Southerner and a Jew descended, as the Spanish Gypsies say, "de las cuatro costas" from Confederate loyalists, a welcome posting!



"My guess is that you meant to refer to Gen. Beauregard."

Yes, she did. Beauregard credited the information he received from Rose Greenhow and Eugenia Phillips with the victory.


"You quote Butler saying that there were 'two Jews in the Confederate cabinet'. I am aware of only one, Judah P. Benjamin; do you know who was the other one?"

Benjamin, "the Brains of the Confderacy" was the only Jew in the cabinet (though he DID serve in three posts there1). Butler was referring to Christopher Gustavus Memminger, Secretary of the Treasury. When told Butler had "accused" him of being of "the race of traitors," Memminger, of German Protestant background, is reported to have said that while he was not Jewish, it was an honor to be mistaken for one. The Beast went looking for Jews behind the drapes and he, along with a whole range of Northern political and military leaders threw around "Jew" as an insult.

As I indicated in my post to the main article, there was a policy of anti-Semitism at work in the North, one of those "untold stories" in the rewrite of the history of the period, but one which we "True Southern" Jews have made sure that we pass on.


"Btw, I think there is a cemetary for Jewish Confederate war veterans in Atlanta."

I am not familiar with a cemetery per se, but there are Jewish Veterans buried in many Confederate Cemeteries. To the best of my knowledge, the only Jewish military cemetery outside of Israel is in Richmond.


"Perhaps articles like this one will produce a more balance Jewish view of modern controversies like that over the Confederate battle flag."

Let us hope so. This has been a "big issue" with me whenever I hear my coreligionists from other parts of the country spouting the politically correct line. I was taught that,as a Jew,I must be loyal to those who have been loyal to us.

Websearch "Confederarate minorities" and my name and you should find my own synopsis of this topic in relation to the Confederate Heritage and its bashing by those ignorant of their history as Americans at this pivotal moment in the 19th Century in our definition of who we are as Americans.


Josef Nix - 3/14/2009


This is a superb article. It is by far and away the best I have ever seen on this fascinating woman who was held up as a female role model by my Granny, may her memory be blessed, and whom I, too, held as a role model for my own children.

First, allow me to express my Southern and Jewish gratitude to the author for her correct and appropriate covering of the special relationship which exists in which, for Southern Jews, the two identities blend into a seamless whole which can be confounding to the outlander.

With that in mind, I would like to make some comments.

“As the doyen of American Jewish history Jacob Rader Marcus writes, ‘The Southern Jewesses were fanatically, almost hysterically, passionate in their sympathies for their new regime. Were they trying to prove that they were more ardent than their neighbors? Why‘ (Marcus, 31)”

The passion so many Jews felt for their native land lay in their loyalty to a people who had not only made them at home in the Diaspora, but who had elevated them to an honored place in that society. They were not trying to “prove” anything. They had reason to be not more, but as ardent as their neighbors. It must be remembered that the Southern Jews were products of the Sephardic experience and brought with them an understanding of “the Wandering Jew” in a personal and not metaphorical sense. Afforded a home and a land into which to sink roots as equal to all around them, they were naturally passionate.

“…the daughter of Jacob Clavius Levy, a merchant, and Fanny Yates Levy, an actress.”

The couple was much more than just this. Mr. Levy was a factor, heavily involved with shipping, and one of the wealthiest men in Charleston. While I have seen Mrs. Levy referred to as an “actress,” I have never seen documentation of that. She was from a prominent Liverpool shipping family and in her capacity as a leader of Charleston society, was hostess to a salon-style form of entertaining, counting among her guests some of the more prominent names of the period. Mr. Levy was a playwright of some note (one of his plays was chosen as the first presentation in Savannah after the war when Southern theatres were allowed to reopen). It was this environment which fed Eugenia’s various interests, her flair for the dramatic, her broad and sophisticated education, and especially her interests in naval matters, this latter which was to land her in hot water later on. While in Mobile she was matronized by Mme. Octavia LeVert, the unchallenged doyenne of Mobile and much of Southern society. Eugenia was hostess to Mme. Kossuth during the Hungarian patriot’s visit to America and she donated from her own considerable financial resources to his efforts.



After one term in Congress, he established a law practice in Washington, D.C.

Phillips established himself as an up and coming politician during the South Carolina Nullification Crisis when, at age 24, he was chosen to present the case for opposition. He held a number of posts in Mobile, among them city attorney under Mobile’s first Jewish mayor, Israel Jones. He applied his skills to infrastructural development. Once in Washington as Congressman he was soon recognized as the “best informed Congressman on matters of Constitutional Law” and was tapped to write the Constitutional argument of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. He began his career practicing before the United States Supreme Court and is credited with being the founder of the United States Court of Claims.

Eugenia and her husband differed greatly…

While this is true insofar as the constitutionality of secession is concerned, Phillips was not opposed to Southern nationalism and repeatedly stated that he would join “the Cause” provided it be framed as a “revolutionary” action. Both he and Eugenia sat with Rose O’Neal Greenhow and Judah Benjamin in Buchanan’s “kitchen cabinet” and Philip went on an unsuccessful mission in the late winter of 1861 to try and convince the seceding states to return peacefully to the Union. Though his stance was not accepted, he was himself held in high esteem by his fellow Southerners and the Phillips family moved into Jefferson Davis’ Washington home following the Senator’s resignation and return to become President of the Confederacy. Even on his own return to the South when Eugenia was released from her first imprisonment and hailed as “a heroine of the Cause,” he continued to maintain his opposition to the claim secession was constitutional, turning down repeated offers of high position in the government.


Eugenia's associations and excessive antagonism toward the Union made her a target for government surveillance.

Eugenia, a prominent hostess, was recognized in the press of the time both at home and abroad as the “best informed American on matters of naval deployment.” Diplomats posted to Washington were instructed to curry her favor. She was an intimate of Maury, the discoverer of ocean currents and father of the Confederate Navy, and herself played an important role in the development of the tactics which brought this branch of the Confederate military to be a force to contend with throughout the war. Just how important she was in all this can be evidenced by the fact that she was sent on ahead of the rest of her family from Richmond in order to give last minute instructions from the government to Slidell and Mason in Charleston the night before their ill-fated mission.
Once in New Orleans, Eugenia was a favorite of both Creole and Anglo society. French culture. She was educated in the Charleston académie français and spoke, read and wrote French with native fluency. Her early childhood had been spent in city where the Huguenot component of the upper crust and the refugees from the Haitian revolt combined to make the city a center of French culture. As mentioned above she was matronized by Mme Levert in Mobile and was a favorite of the city’s Creole population. She was “back in her element” in New Orleans and her choice to live in the Vieux Carré made her popular with the city’s French element. Phillip’s business as lawyer for the international concerns in the city put her in contact with the diplomatic circles.
On occupation, Butler lost no time in letting her know he was “out to get her,” she and he pulled before him on his third day in the city, to answer charges in “the spitting incident.”
Butler’s anti-woman venom was notorious. Above his dais where he “held court” was a sign reading “she adders are more venomous than he adders.” He was equally anti-Semitic as pointed out here. In the exiles of the summer and fall of 1863, fully 7/8 of the Jewish community, including the city’s internationally recognized Rabbi Gutheim, were exiled, many of them, as were the Phillips family following her release from Ship Island, aboard ships unprovisioned, overcrowded and left “to find a port that would have them.”
When Lincoln sent his agent Zachery to make contact with Jews loyal to the Union, there were no Jews to be found. As late as 1864 Butler was listing Jews with swine as “seized contraband.”
Eugenia’s case was brought before Napoleon III and the British Parliament with Lord Palmerston threatening to break relations with the Washington government and recognition of the Richmond government. According to Reverdy Johnson, who negotiated Eugenia’s second release, this was the motive behind Lincoln’s drafting of the Emancipation Proclamation, playing to the abolitionist sentiments of Europe.

“Although Eugenia was a practicing Jew, she saw herself especially during the war as primarily a Southerner who would support her "country" at all costs…”

The use of the word “although” bothers me. As my ancestors, I feel no conflict between he two identities. This hints at the “alien other,” something which has not been a
part of the weltanschauung of this “portion of the people” at home with their neighbors since the Carolina Charter gave “equal rights of citizenship to Jews, Heathens and Dissenters.”

“…and as the war demonstrated Southerners and the Confederacy were more tolerant of Jews than the Union army that ravaged the South, Southern Jews recognized this and devotedly aligned themselves with their beloved South at all costs.”

The Northern policies of anti-Semitism are topic for such an entry as this present essay.


Robert Lee Gaston - 9/10/2008

I think Charleston South Carolina was one of the first cities in North America to grant all the rights and privledges of citizenship.

The city's 1669 charter drawn up by the English philosopher John Locke er granted liberty of conscience to all settlers, expressly mentioning "Jews, heathens, and dissenters."

Two little known facts about Charleston’s Jewish community are that Jewish merchants moving to Charleston from the French Caribbean introduced a French variation of freemasonry into North America that later evolved into what is known as the Scottish Rite, and that they produced at least one confederate general officer (Gen. E. W. Moise) , who later became the adjutant-general of the state of South Carolina




R.R. Hamilton - 8/26/2008

I have not read it all, but I just want to offer a few comments thus far:

First, a correction: You refer to the First Manassas campaign and "Confederate General McDowell". Maj. Gen. McDowell was the Federal commander. The Confederates had two commanders in the campaign: Maj. Gen. Joe Johnston who was in overall command but not at the scene, and Maj. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, who Gen. Johnston allowed to command the battle. My guess is that you meant to refer to Gen. Beauregard.

You quote Butler saying that there were "two Jews in the Confederate cabinet". I am aware of only one, Judah P. Benjamin; do you know who was the other one?

Btw, I think there is a cemetary for Jewish Confederate war veterans in Atlanta.

Perhaps articles like this one will produce a more balance Jewish view of modern controversies like that over the Confederate battle flag.