Blogs > Cliopatria > Problems, Questions, and Discussions

Oct 4, 2007 2:46 am


Problems, Questions, and Discussions



Joseph Berger,"Exploring Ways to Shorten the Ascent to a Ph.D.," NYT, 3 October, looks at ways some graduate programs are doing it.

Asli A. Bashir,"Navigating Tenure," Harvard Crimson, 3 October, explores problems in the University's tenure review process.

Tim Burke,"That Which is Discussable," Easily Distracted, 3 October, lists six kinds of queries or observations that can lead to good discussion.

Miriam Burstein,"How to ask Questions on Academic Listservs: Gentle Hints," Little Professor, 1 October. Yes, indeedy!

Carlin Romano,"Are Sacred Texts Sacred? The Challenge for Atheists," CHE, 21 September, launched a significant discussion among Jason Kuznicki, Brandon Watson, Nathanael Robinson, Kuznicki, and Watson.

Finally, there are times when there's nothing left to discuss. Just ask John W. Swailes, the former chairman of the history department at Oral Roberts University. It's a remarkable story. The IRS is investigating. Swailes is suing. The filing sizzles. If half of what the plaintiffs allege is true, it would be a blessing if the Lord closed the place down.




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Ralph E. Luker - 10/5/2007

Tim, Here's a sketch about Swailes. His family background is Pentecostal Holiness, but his degrees are from Brandeis and University of Georgia. Campus Watch recommends him, which probably means that he is pro-Israeli because of his religious beliefs.
I suspect that the IRS ought to look into the involvement of ORU students in political campaigns outside of Oklahoma. The Republican National Committee wants ORU students working on its behalf, but there's no mention of ORU students *ever* having worked for a Democrat.


Tim Lacy - 10/4/2007

Ralph,

I went to the Tulsa World link. Wow. And the comments on the article add to the craziness. Is this not just the natural ending for a higher education (I refuse to sully the term university) administration that was a disguised oligarchy/family tyranny?

I couldn't find anything about Professor Swailes. Does he have something fun to add to the narrative? - TL


Alan Allport - 10/4/2007

I can't login, and therefore comment, directly on Tim's blog; so I'll just say here that his post is the best - indeed, just about the only - discussion of this crucial issue that I've seen in five years of college teaching. Bravo!