Blogs > HNN > WILL DEATH SENTENCE STIFLE IRANIAN PROTEST?

Oct 8, 2009 2:15 pm


WILL DEATH SENTENCE STIFLE IRANIAN PROTEST?



As you can see, Iranians refuse to shut up. They continue their protest day and night and it is not limited to Tehran. As Stalinist show trials in which protesters, such as Mohammad Reza Ali Zamani, confessed their sins, failed to do the trick. and encouraged by such signals as the Obama administration's decision to cut off funding for Iranian Human-Rights Documentation, Ahmadinejad and company are making yet another effort to scare Iranians into compliance - a death sentence.

Mohammad Reza Ali Zamani"was transferred on Monday from Evin prison ward 209 to Revolutionary Court number 15, presided over by judge Salabati, and the execution verdict was communicated to him." Hanging!

The crime? . . ."propaganda activities against the Islamic establishment and taking part in rallies with the aim of undermining national security."

The sentence can be and undoubtedly will be appealed. The question remains: will Iranians be cowed to stop protesting?

France stands by the Iranian people:

We were extremely shocked to learn of the death sentence handed down on Mohammad Reza Ali-Zamani in Iran. The announcement of this decision tarnishes still further the image of the Iranian regime.

Like the whole international community, France observed the scale of the popular protest in the wake of the announcement of the results of the 12 June election.

The mobilization of a large section of Iranian society is continuing despite the crackdown.

We salute the courage of all the Iranian citizens who, despite the successive waves of repression and violence, are demonstrating peacefully in defence of their basic rights.

Will the Obama administration follow suit? We have learned not to expect it to lead when it comes to the subjects of authoritarian regimes. As even Indians are realizing, this"liberal" administration is much too enamored with the law and order of autocracies.

Let's hope so.




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