;

Historians in the News

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • Review: How the Germans Coped With Defeat

    by Richard J. Evans

    Monica Black's new book argues that irrationality and mysticism filled the cultural void created by defeat and the discrediting of Nazism in postwar Germany; Richard Evans says it doesn't quite prove its case, but offers insight into the present spread of nonsense on social media.



  • The Storm over the American Revolution

    by Eric Herschthal

    By shoehorning his recent book on the Revolutionary War into the space of the debate about slavery and the founding, critics of Woody Holton are missing important points about the importance of indigenous land to the founding and the global context of colonial independence.



  • Lizabeth Cohen: Why Americans Buy So Much Stuff

    As holiday shopping overlaps with historic supply chain disruptions, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Lizabeth Cohen on the economy's reliance on spending and the culture of consumerism in the U.S.



  • David Olusoga: Support Historians in Culture War Crosshairs

    “These new history wars have the warped logic of a witch trial; their aim is to convince people that they are being oppressed by the irrefutable facts of their own national histories, such as slavery in America, or the British Empire,” University of Manchester historian David Olusoga said.



  • The Rise and Fall (And Rise?) of Labor

    Historian Erik Loomis discusses whether the wave of labor activism will start to reverse a half-century of successful union busting by big business. 



  • We All Live in the John Birch Society's World Now

    Edward Miller's new book presents the case that the John Birch Society was not a retrograde reactionary force but the vanguard of modern conservative culture war politics. 



  • Tim Snyder: "It Turns Out People Really Like Democracy"

    “America first” and “enemies of the people” are words that are consciously applied by people who wish to destroy democracy. If people don’t know how those words have been applied in the past, then that is dangerous.



  • Direct Action: The Practical Politics of Protest

    by Erin Pineda

    "Protesters may be a loud minority of citizens, a set of especially motivated and impassioned individuals who are in many ways not representative of the general public. But the silent majority of voters are not as disconnected from—or dismissive of—protest as many assume."



  • Helen Roche's Work Examines the Elite Schools Nazis Modeled on Eton

    Helen Roche has published the first comprehensive history of the Napolas, the schools Nazis established to train future leaders of the Reich, and notes deep patterns of exchange between teachers and students at British and German schools before the start of war.