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Historians in the News

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • David Carter, a Historian of Stonewall, Is Dead at 67

    David Carter's research clarified conflicting accounts of the events of June 28, 1969 and helped ensure that the portion of Greenwich Village surrounding the Stonewall Inn would be protected by the National Register of Historic Places.



  • Is Capitalism Racist?

    Nicholas Lemann considers Walter Johnson's new book The Broken Heart of America in light of recent debates among historians about the relationship of slavery, capitalism and racism.



  • America’s Immigration Paradox

    A review of Jia Lynn Yang's new work "One Mighty and Irresistible Tide," and Adam Goodman's "The Deportation Machine."



  • Columbus Historian Hits Streets in Search of African American Stories

    Rita Fuller-Yates earned a bachelor's degree in history and worked in corporate America and as a lifestyle columnist. But now she's a fierce avocate for memorializing one of Ohio's black leaders (and the history of African Americans in Columbus) on the grounds of the Statehouse.



  • Keynes and the Good Life

    by Jeffrey Sachs

    Keynes did not give us a checklist of dos and don’ts other than general ones: Don’t waste human talents and physical resources through wanton unemployment, avoidable wars, or breakdowns of social and trade relations.



  • Pandemic Narratives and the Historian

    A group of historians including Alison Bashford, Simuka Chigudu, Deborah Coen, Richard Keller, Julie Livingston, Nayan Shah and Paul Weindling discuss the helpful and harmful ways historians have examined the COVID-19 crisis. 



  • Baseball History and Rural America

    The study of how baseball evolved, historain David Vaught writes, remains a test of how history is written--from concern with origin moments or attention to ongoing processes of change and development.



  • Did The South Win The Civil War?

    In this podcast, Historian Heather Cox Richardson discusses her new book "How The South Won The Civil War: Oligarchy, Democracy, And The Continuing Fight For The Soul Of America."