;

Roundup



  • James Sweet Shouldn't Have Apologized for the Truth

    by Jeffrey Herf

    "Those who repress inconvenient facts or produce fictitious evidence to nourish a politically convenient story are simply not historians—they are activists or propagandists."



  • The Forgotten Violence of the US-Philippines Relationship

    by Adrian De Leon

    By declaring a relationship of "friends, partners, and allies" between the United States and the Philippines, and embracing the regime of Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., the United States concealed its violent conquest of the islands and its ongoing support for authoritarian rule there. 



  • The Risks of Declaring the Pandemic Over

    by Molly Nebiolo

    As long as America has had pandemics, it has had leaders who sought political benefit by declaring them over, so Joe Biden is in good company. But moving on needs to include planning ahead. 



  • Black Women's Activism Ties Reproductive Rights to Broader Goals of Freedom

    by Kim Gallon

    Black women's reproductive lives have always been complicated by institutional racism, sexism, and the balance of personal autonomy and racial solidarity. Black feminists have struggled to use the African American press as a space to force discussion of the issues. 



  • Does History Show a Remedy for Dark Money?

    by Bo Blew

    Until 1969's Tax Reform Act, private foundations allowed the rich to influence policy and avoid taxation with haphazard oversight by the states. The new generation of independent political action groups needs similar federal oversight.



  • "Misogynoir" Exemplified in the Degradation of Black Women Athletes

    by Donald Earl Collins

    The treatment of basketball star Brittney Griner by Russian authorities (and the indifference to her case by many Americans) shows that Black women athletes still have to navigate a world of racism and sexism that diminishes their achievements and their security. 



  • Far Right Presence in Law Enforcement is Scary, but Not New

    by Anna Duensing

    Edwin Walker oversaw the National Guard's enforcement of integration in Little Rock out of duty. He held a personal repugnance of integration and soon traded his military career for the far right. Today's Oath Keepers are his political descendants.



  • Puerto Rico Needs Public Electric Utilities, Not More Privatization

    by Alex Standen

    Worker protest movements created the public utilities that used to provide electricity to Puerto Rico. In the face of the disastrous failure of the privatized utility system highlighted by Hurricanes Fiona and Maria, a similar movement is needed now. 



  • There Are Two Ways America Can Go After January 6

    by Thomas Zimmer

    In some respects, the January 6 attack resembles the failed 1923 Beer Hall Putsch. What should concern us is what could happen if the Justice Department decides to give similarly lenient treatment to the Capitol conspirators and their leader. 



  • After Four Decades, Iranian Women's Frustrations are Erupting

    by Kelly J. Shannon

    Since the 1990s, Iranian women have been engaged in slowly escalating protest against the restrictions imposed by the Islamic Republic. Have those protests become too large and too public to be contained? 



  • Why Conservatives Have Turned Against Academic Freedom Again

    by John K. Wilson

    The legacies of William F. Buckley and Ronald Reagan suggest that the right demands freedom for its own perspective that it actively seeks to deny to radical critics of capitalism, religion, and conservatism. 



  • Teaching Black Perspectives

    by Julia W. Bernier

    Since emancipation, the effort to control curriculum has been a key part of broad reactionary politics opposing greater freedom for Black people. Educators and activists have seen today's battles over teaching the history of racism before.