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Nazism



  • Hitler’s ‘Mein Kampf’ Gets New French Edition, With Each Lie Annotated

    The publishers, who will donate proceeds to the Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation, argue that with other versions of Hitler's manifesto circulating widely, a translation that preserves the incoherence and paranoia of the original with extensive debunking commentary is a positive contribution to efforts to fight the far right. 



  • Germany Faced its Horrible Past. Can the US Do the Same?

    by Michele Norris

    "A full accounting of slavery is one of terror and trauma, and for decades the natural inclination was to ask, why would anyone want to claim that history?... What happens if we don’t?" Michele Norris's essay features University of Texas historian Daina Ramey Berry.



  • Why Weimar is an Imperfect Mirror

    by Helmut Smith

    Peter Gay's "Weimar Culture: The Outsider as Insider" became a key text for understanding the Weimar era as an allegory for understanding political conflict when it was published in 1968. But his psychoanalytical approach can be an impediment to understanding the historical specificity of the era. 



  • Of Nazis, Crimes and Punishment

    Understanding the neurological changes brought on by adolescence and aging make it complicated to determine what justice is in the case of a Nazi camp guard deported from the United States to Germany in February. 



  • The Persistence of Hate In American Politics

    After Charlottesville, the historian Joan Wallach Scott wanted to find out how societies face up to their past—and why some fail. Aryeh Neier reviews Scott's comparative history of the Nuremberg Trials, the South African Truth and Reconciliation effort, and the debate over reparations to African Americans for slavery and Jim Crow. 



  • No More Lies. My Grandfather Was a Nazi

    "Suddenly, I no longer had any idea who my grandfather was, what Lithuania was, and how my own story fit in. How could I reconcile two realities? Was Jonas Noreika a monster who slaughtered thousands of Jews or a hero who fought to save his country from the Communists?" writes Silvia Foti. 



  • Pre-Nazi Germany Tells us the Fight to Save American Democracy is Just Beginning

    by Michael Brenner

    German history highlights how the real risk to American democracy came hours after order had been restored in the U.S. Capitol when seven U.S. senators and 138 members of the House of Representatives voted to sustain an objection to Pennsylvania’s electoral votes.