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political history



  • When Black Voters Went Blue

    Leah Wright Rigeur discusses the process by which Black voters shifted from loyal Republicans to Democrats. 



  • Want to See Black Women Making History? Look to Congress

    by Ashley D. Farmer

    The success of "The Squad" in changing the image of Congressional leadership reflects the legacy of women like Barbara Jordan, the first Black woman elected to the Texas state senate on the way to a seat in Congress. 


  • Lessons from the 18th Century Dutch Republic

    by Matthijs Tieleman

    The history of the Dutch Republic demonstrates that polarization can gradually destroy a country from within and can easily be exploited by foreign actors. The embrace of political pluralism by every citizen is the key antidote to the rot of polarization.



  • The Deep Roots of Disdain for Black Political Leaders

    by Carole Emberton

    From Thomas Jefferson's writings, through the proslavery argument of the middle of the 19th century, the overthrow of Reconstruction, and the Jim Crow era, American politics has been influenced by the racist idea that Black people were incapable of exercising leadership in a democracy.



  • Disdain for the Less Educated Is the Last Acceptable Prejudice

    by Michael J. Sandel

    Joe Biden has a secret weapon in his bid for the presidency: He is the first Democratic nominee in 36 years without a degree from an Ivy League university. His campaign may test the pervasive belief that elite academic credentials are a necessity to govern.



  • What We Don't Understand About Fascism

    by Victoria de Grazia

    It is less useful to draw comparisons between today's right-wing politics and past fascist parties than it is to understand how broad crisis in society resembles the conditions from which fascism arose.