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partisanship


  • The Post-Trump GOP: Rebirth or Stillbirth?

    by Michael A. Genovese

    The Republicans are betting that sticking with Trump's MAGA posture will usher in a political realignment with a broader GOP base. History shows that with anger and resentment standing in for a substantive policy agenda that meets the challenges of the times such a realignment is unlikely.


  • "Hamilton" and Politics Today

    by Donald J. Fraser

    The phenomenally successful "Hamilton" takes some liberties with its subject, but it still offers some valuable perspective on our politics today. 



  • What Lincoln Understood About Unity

    by Harold Holzer

    "The fact is, even the most eloquent calls for harmony seldom repair a house divided — not without the accompaniment of painful but unavoidable choices about national policy and purpose."



  • Just Forget About Donald Trump

    by Peter Wehner

    It may be difficult for many Americans to let go of deep anger at Donald Trump and the political movement he represents, but it will be necessary. 



  • How SCOTUS Nominations Became All-Out War

    by Robert L. Tsai

    The rise of national parties, the use of the judiciary to advance policy goals, and the decision of Republican leadership to consolidate a narrow electoral base have made judicial nominations a partisan battle the Founders did not adequately anticipate, according to American U. Law professor Robert Tsai.



  • Deep Political Fissures May Worsen the Coronavirus Outbreak

    by Jordan E. Taylor

    During a massive outbreak of yellow fever in the nation’s then-capital city, Philadelphia, members of the earliest parties in the United States took advantage of medical uncertainty to advance partisan agendas.



  • Today’s Eerie Echoes of the Civil War

    by Manisha Sinha

    We would do well to pay heed to the old enmities bubbling up in our politics: it is not that we are on the verge of another civil war, but that the Civil War never truly ended.



  • Murky waters: partisanship and foreign policy

    by Lewis L. Gould

    It’s time to retire the hoary phrase about politics and the water’s edge. It was never a guiding principle of American foreign policy before 1900.