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environmental history



  • Spin Doctors Have Shaped the Environmental Debate for Decades

    by Melissa Aronczyk

    E. Bruce Harrison shifted American business's response to the environmental movement from a posture of denial and refusal to one of strategic compromise that elevated industry's scientists to an authoritative position which has kept a brake on green reforms and regulation. 



  • The Problem of Environmental Racism in Mexico Today is Rooted in History

    by Jayson Maurice Porter

    The marginalization of Afro-Mexican history in the state of Guerrero is product of a history of government-sanctioned development that harmed marginalized communities; ignorance of that history prevents considering policy solutions that could advance environmental justice in areas harmed by tourism development and deforestation. 



  • "A Life on Our Planet" Provides Environmental Hope

    by Walter G. Moss

    Although the recent Netflix documentary on the global environment describes a grim present, it explains a path forward that is simple (if the political will can be found). 



  • Cancer Cases Likely in Those Exposed to New Mexico Atomic Test

    National Cancer Institute findings suggest that it is likely that some people exposed to fallout from the Trinity atomic bomb tests got cancer as a result. However, the incomplete data available make it unclear if the findings will help advance legislation to compensate "downwinders" for health damage.   



  • Why Hurricane Katrina Was Not a Natural Disaster

    by Nicholas Lemann

    Fifteen years ago, New Orleans was nearly destroyed. A new book by Tulane historian Andy Horowitz suggests that the cause was decades of bad policy—and that nothing has changed.



  • The Environmental Costs of War

    The effort to secure and refine aluminum ore for war materiel was environmentally damaging and previews the globalized impact of commodity supply chains. 



  • How the World’s Largest Garbage Dump Evolved Into a Green Oasis

    Freshkills is possibly the least likely poster child for urban ecological restoration in the world, and it is radical not just for the way it works — by encouraging flora and fauna do as they please — but for its sheer size. It is almost unbelievable that New York City would set aside a parcel of land as big as Lower Manhattan south of 23rd Street — and just let it go to seed.



  • Learning From the Kariba Dam

    The history of the Kariba Dam is the story of a war over the past and the future of a river.